3-Axis Machining with Autodesk Fusion 360

Start Date: 08/09/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/3-axis-machining-autodesk-fusion-360

About Course

As our machining geometry gets more complicated, Autodesk® Fusion 360™ is up to the task! With a host of standard and adaptive toolpaths we can rapidly remove material from even the most complicated 3d parts. In this course, we explore how to rough and finish geometry that requires tool motion in X, Y, and Z simultaneously, learning how to finish even the finest of details. We’ll wrap up this course by creating a full CNC program for a part, simulating it, and exporting it to G-code. Want to take your learning to the next level? Complete the Autodesk CAD/CAM for Manufacturing Specialization, and you’ll unlock an additional Autodesk Credential as further recognition of your success! The Autodesk Credential comes with a digital badge and certificate, which you can add to your resume and share on social media platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Sharing your Autodesk Credential can signal to hiring managers that you’ve got the right skills for the job and you’re up on the latest industry trends like generative design. Enroll in the Specialization here: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/autodesk-cad-cam-manufacturing

Course Syllabus

Basics of 3-axis pocketing
Understanding and Applying Adaptive Toolpaths
Creating Fine Detail Finishing Toolpaths
Creating a Complete CNC Program

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Course Introduction

3-Axis Machining with Autodesk Fusion 360 CAD This course is designed to introduce CAD fundamentals to 3D machinists. The material we use in this course is what we call "3-Axis machining"”. It is a common practice among machinists to grind parts of the 3D CAD model from the CAD file to a flat, 3D-file. For this course, we will assume you have a CAD software program that you use to quickly and easily make designs. In addition, we will assume for the course that you are using an operating system that is similar to Windows 7. If you do not have a computer with Windows 7, you can use an emulator or other OS that runs on a 3D-format. Lessons will be delivered through videos and hands-on exercises. The course will cover material such as: ● Extrusion, radial versus central heat treatment, 3D machining, and waste reduction. ● Damping, power-link isolation, and forced duct alignment. ● Design of valves, piping, and fittings. ● Design of shafts and gears. ● Design of bearings and bearings gears. ● Theory of thrust and gearboxes. ● Design of bearings and gears assemblies. ● Design of bearings and gears assemblies for circuit breakers. ● Design of shafts and gears for connecting rods and rods. ● The use of bearings and gears to align rods and other gearboxes. ● Solid state modeling of the external

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Autodesk Autodesk's manufacturing industry group is headquartered in Lake Oswego, Oregon. The company's manufacturing software is used in various manufacturing segments, including industrial machinery, electro-mechanical, tool and die, industrial equipment, automotive components, and consumer products. Products include Fusion 360, the Autodesk Product Design Suite, Autodesk Factory Design Suite, Autodesk Inventor Suite, Autodesk Inventor Professional Suite, AutoCAD Mechanical, Autodesk Vault, Alias Products, Simulation Mechanical, CFD, and Moldflow.
Multiaxis machining There are now many CAM (computer aided manufacturing) software systems available to support multiaxis machining including software that can automatically convert 3-axis toolpaths into 5-axis toolpaths.
Machining STRATEGIST machining STRATEGIST is a CAM application software now sold by Vero International Software for the purposes of generating G-codes for 3-axis CNC machines. It specializes in high speed machining.
SimScale A SimScale add-in for Autodesk Fusion 360 has been released to allow direct import of models from Autodesk Fusion 360 to SimScale.
2.5D (machining) A 2.5D machine, also called a two-and-a-half-axis mill, possesses the capability to translate in all three axes but can perform the cutting operation only in two of the three axes at a time due to hardware or software limitations, or a machine that has a solenoid instead of a true, linear Z axis. A typical example involves an XY table that positions for each hole center, where the spindle (Z-axis) then completes a fixed cycle for drilling by plunging and retracting axially. The code for a 2.5D machining is significantly less than 3D contour machining, and the software and hardware requirements are (traditionally) less expensive. Drilling and tapping centers are inexpensive, limited-duty machining centers that began as a 2.5-axis market category, although many late-model ones are 3-axis because the software and hardware costs have dropped with advancing technology.
Machining Since the advent of new technologies such as electrical discharge machining, electrochemical machining, electron beam machining, photochemical machining, and ultrasonic machining, the retronym "conventional machining" can be used to differentiate those classic technologies from the newer ones. In current usage, the term "machining" without qualification usually implies the traditional machining processes.
Multiaxis machining Multiaxis machining is a manufacturing process where computer numerically controlled tools that move in 4 or more ways are used to manufacture parts out of metal or other materials by milling away excess material, by water jet cutting or by laser cutting. Typical CNC tools support translation in 3 axis; multiaxis machines also support rotation around one or multiple axis.
Autodesk Platform Solutions and Emerging Business (PSEB) division develops and manages the product foundation for most Autodesk offerings across multiple markets, including Autodesk's flagship product AutoCAD, AutoCAD LT, AutoCAD for Mac, and AutoCAD 360. Autodesk Suites, Subscription and Web Services, which includes Autodesk Cloud, Autodesk Labs, and Global Engineering are also part of PSEB. In what was seen as an unusual step for a maker of high-end business software, Autodesk began offering AutoCAD LT 2012 for Mac through the Apple Mac App Store. Also part of PSEB is the Autodesk Consumer Product Group, which was created in November 2010 to generate interest in 3-D design and “foster a new wave of designers who hunger for sophisticated software”. The products from the group include 123D, Fluid FX, Homestyler, Pixlr, and SketchBook. Users range from children, students and artists to makers and DIYers.
Machining More recent, advanced machining techniques include precision CNC machining, electrical discharge machining (EDM), electro-chemical erosion, laser cutting, or water jet cutting to shape metal workpieces.
Autodesk Autodesk became best known for AutoCAD but now develops a broad range of software for design, engineering, and entertainment as well as a line of software for consumers, including Sketchbook, Homestyler, and Pixlr. The company makes educational versions of its software available at no cost to qualified students and faculty through the Autodesk Education Community, and also as a donation to eligible nonprofits through TechSoup Global. Autodesk's digital prototyping software, including Autodesk Inventor, Fusion 360, and the Autodesk Product Design Suite, are used in the manufacturing industry to visualize, simulate, and analyze real-world performance using a digital model during the design process. The company's Revit line of software for Building Information Modeling is designed to let users explore the planning, construction, and management of a building virtually before it is built.
Autodesk Autodesk develops and purchased many specific-purpose renderers but many Autodesk products are bundled with third-party renderers such as NVIDIA MentalRay or Iray.
Machining Other conventional machining operations include shaping, planing, broaching and sawing. Also, grinding and similar abrasive operations are often included within the category of machining.
Electrical discharge machining Along with tighter tolerances, multi axis EDM wire-cutting machining centers have added features such as multi heads for cutting two parts at the same time, controls for preventing wire breakage, automatic self-threading features in case of wire breakage, and programmable machining strategies to optimize the operation.
Milling (machining) Milling is the machining process of using rotary cutters to remove material from a workpiece by advancing (or "feeding") in a direction at an angle with the axis of the tool. It covers a wide variety of different operations and machines, on scales from small individual parts to large, heavy-duty gang milling operations. It is one of the most commonly used processes in industry and machine shops today for machining parts to precise sizes and shapes.
Autodesk Vault After the asset acquisition of truEInnovations by Autodesk in 2003, Autodesk began to further the integration of the product into the manufacturing product line, starting with Autodesk Inventor.
Milling (machining) Since the 1960s there has developed an overlap of usage between the terms milling machine and machining center. NC/CNC machining centers evolved from milling machines, which is why the terminology evolved gradually with considerable overlap that still persists. The distinction, when one is made, is that a machining center is a mill with features that pre-CNC mills never had, especially an automatic tool changer (ATC) that includes a tool magazine (carousel), and sometimes an automatic pallet changer (APC). In typical usage, all machining centers are mills, but not all mills are machining centers; only mills with ATCs are machining centers.
Machining Machining is a part of the manufacture of many metal products, but it can also be used on materials such as wood, plastic, ceramic, and composites. A person who specializes in machining is called a machinist. A room, building, or company where machining is done is called a machine shop. Machining can be a business, a hobby, or both. Much of modern-day machining is carried out by computer numerical control (CNC), in which computers are used to control the movement and operation of the mills, lathes, and other cutting machines.
Autodesk Autodesk Media and Entertainment products are designed for digital media creation, management, and delivery, from film and television visual effects, color grading, and editing to animation, game development, and design visualization. Autodesk’s Media and Entertainment Division is based in Montreal, Quebec. It was established in 1999 after Autodesk, Inc. acquired Discreet Logic, Inc. and merged its operations with Kinetix. In January 2006, Autodesk acquired Alias, a developer of 3D graphics technology. In October 2008, Autodesk acquired the Softimage brand from Avid. The principal product offerings from the Media and Entertainment Division are the Autodesk Entertainment Creation Suites, which include Maya, Softimage, 3ds Max, Mudbox, Smoke, Flame, and Lustre.
Machining With the recent proliferation of additive manufacturing technologies, conventional machining has been retronymously classified, in thought and language, as a subtractive manufacturing method. In narrow contexts, additive and subtractive methods may compete with each other. In the broad context of entire industries, their relationship is complementary. Each method has its own advantages over the other. While additive manufacturing methods can produce very intricate prototype designs impossible to replicate by machining, strength and material selection may be limited.
Screw axis In crystallography, a screw axis symmetry is combination of rotation about an axis and a translation parallel to that axis leaves a crystal unchanged. If "φ" = 360°/"n" for some positive integer "n", then screw axis symmetry implies translational symmetry with a translation vector which is "n" times that of the screw displacement.