Actualización en el manejo del paciente con diabetes mellitus tipo 2

Start Date: 05/19/2019

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/actualizacion-manejo-diabetes-tipo-2

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About Course

Este curso esta diseñado para ofrecer información actualizada sobre el manejo del paciente con diabetes mellitus tipo 2, con la finalidad de mejorar su atención médica. El curso está dirigido a médicos y profesionales sanitarios que tienen contacto con pacientes diabéticos; con ello, se busca disminuir la morbimortalidad de esta enfermedad y mejorar la calidad de vida de quienes la padecen. Este curso incluye temas relacionados con el manejo nutricional y la actividad física, así como estrategias de manejo farmacológico según el contexto clínico del paciente, a partir de sus comorbilidades y preferencias.

Course Syllabus

Importancia del plan de alimentación y la actividad física en el paciente con diabetes mellitus tipo 2
Fármacos utilizados en el manejo del paciente con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 diferentes a la insulina
Insulinoterapia en el paciente con diabetes mellitus tipo 2
Estrategias terapéuticas en el paciente con diabetes mellitus tipo 2, basadas en la presencia de complicaciones crónicas, comorbilidades y situaciones especiales

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Course Introduction

Este curso esta diseñado para ofrecer información actualizada sobre el manejo del paciente con diabetes mellitus tipo 2, con la finalidad de mejorar s

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Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Diabetes mellitus The term "type 1 diabetes" has replaced several former terms, including childhood-onset diabetes, juvenile diabetes, and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Likewise, the term "type 2 diabetes" has replaced several former terms, including adult-onset diabetes, obesity-related diabetes, and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Beyond these two types, there is no agreed-upon standard nomenclature.
Diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus is classified into four broad categories: type 1, type 2, gestational diabetes, and "other specific types". The "other specific types" are a collection of a few dozen individual causes. Diabetes is a more variable disease than once thought and people may have combinations of forms. The term "diabetes", without qualification, usually refers to diabetes mellitus.
Diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus is also occasionally known as "sugar diabetes" to differentiate it from diabetes insipidus.
Diabetes mellitus type 2 Diabetes mellitus type 2 is characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. This is in contrast to diabetes mellitus type 1 in which there is an absolute insulin deficiency due to destruction of islet cells in the pancreas and gestational diabetes mellitus that is a new onset of high blood sugars associated with pregnancy. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes can typically be distinguished based on the presenting circumstances. If the diagnosis is in doubt antibody testing may be useful to confirm type 1 diabetes and C-peptide levels may be useful to confirm type 2 diabetes, with C-peptide levels normal or high in type 2 diabetes, but low in type 1 diabetes.
Diabetes mellitus type 2 Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and not enough exercise. Some people are more genetically at risk than others. Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes, with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes. In diabetes mellitus type 1 there is an absolute lack of insulin due to breakdown of islet cells in the pancreas. Diagnosis of diabetes is by blood tests such as fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, or A1C.
Diabetes mellitus Type 2 DM is characterized by insulin resistance, which may be combined with relatively reduced insulin secretion. The defective responsiveness of body tissues to insulin is believed to involve the insulin receptor. However, the specific defects are not known. Diabetes mellitus cases due to a known defect are classified separately. Type 2 DM is the most common type of diabetes mellitus.
Diabetes mellitus Other forms of diabetes mellitus include congenital diabetes, which is due to genetic defects of insulin secretion, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, steroid diabetes induced by high doses of glucocorticoids, and several forms of monogenic diabetes.
Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy Planning in advance is emphasized if one wants to have a baby and has type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pregnancy management for diabetics needs stringent blood glucose control even in advance of having pregnancy.
Diabetes mellitus Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) resembles type 2 DM in several respects, involving a combination of relatively inadequate insulin secretion and responsiveness. It occurs in about 2–10% of all pregnancies and may improve or disappear after delivery. However, after pregnancy approximately 5–10% of women with gestational diabetes are found to have diabetes mellitus, most commonly type 2. Gestational diabetes is fully treatable, but requires careful medical supervision throughout the pregnancy. Management may include dietary changes, blood glucose monitoring, and in some cases, insulin may be required.
Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM) is a form of diabetes mellitus presenting at birth that is not permanent. This disease is considered to be a type of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY).
Diabetes mellitus Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced. There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:
Diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus is characterized by recurrent or persistent high blood sugar, and is diagnosed by demonstrating any one of the following:
Diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease, for which there is no known cure except in very specific situations. Management concentrates on keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal, without causing low blood sugar. This can usually be accomplished with a healthy diet, exercise, weight loss, and use of appropriate medications (insulin in the case of type 1 diabetes; oral medications, as well as possibly insulin, in type 2 diabetes).
Complications of diabetes mellitus Diabetic coma is a medical emergency in which a person with diabetes mellitus is comatose (unconscious) because of one of the acute complications of diabetes:
Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy Diabetes mellitus may be effectively managed by appropriate meal planning, increased physical activity and properly-instituted insulin treatment. Some tips for controlling diabetes in pregnancy include:
Diabetes mellitus Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by loss of the insulin-producing beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, leading to insulin deficiency. This type can be further classified as immune-mediated or idiopathic. The majority of type 1 diabetes is of the immune-mediated nature, in which a T-cell-mediated autoimmune attack leads to the loss of beta cells and thus insulin. It causes approximately 10% of diabetes mellitus cases in North America and Europe. Most affected people are otherwise healthy and of a healthy weight when onset occurs. Sensitivity and responsiveness to insulin are usually normal, especially in the early stages. Type 1 diabetes can affect children or adults, but was traditionally termed "juvenile diabetes" because a majority of these diabetes cases were in children.
Diabetes mellitus type 1 Diabetes mellitus is characterized by recurrent or persistent hyperglycemia, and is diagnosed by demonstrating any one of the following:
Epidemiology of diabetes mellitus About 3.8 million people in the United Kingdom have diabetes mellitus, but the charity Diabetes U.K. have made predictions that could become high as 6.2 million by 2035/2036. The NHS spent a daily average of £2.2m (€2.6m; $3.7m) in 2013 on prescriptions for managing diabetes in primary care, and about 10% of the primary care prescribing budget is spent on treating diabetes. Diabetes U.K. have also predicted that the National Health Service could be spending as much as 16.9 billion pounds on diabetes mellitus by 2035, a figure that means the NHS could be spending as much as 17% of its budget on diabetes treatment by 2035.
Prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 Prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 can be achieved with both lifestyle changes and use of medication. The American Diabetes Association categorizes prediabetes as a high-risk group that has glycemic levels higher than normal but does not meet criteria for diabetes. Without intervention people with prediabetes progress to type 2 diabetes with a 5% to 10% rate. Diabetes prevention is achieved through weight loss and increased physical activity, which can reduce the risk of diabetes by 50% to 60%.
Diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period. Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger. If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications. Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, nonketotic hyperosmolar coma, or death. Serious long-term complications include heart disease, stroke, chronic kidney failure, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.