Data Visualization with Advanced Excel

Start Date: 07/05/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/advanced-excel

About Course

In this course, you will get hands-on instruction of advanced Excel 2013 functions. You’ll learn to use PowerPivot to build databases and data models. We’ll show you how to perform different types of scenario and simulation analysis and you’ll have an opportunity to practice these skills by leveraging some of Excel's built in tools including, solver, data tables, scenario manager and goal seek. In the second half of the course, will cover how to visualize data, tell a story and explore data by reviewing core principles of data visualization and dashboarding. You’ll use Excel to build complex graphs and Power View reports and then start to combine them into dynamic dashboards. Note: Learners will need PowerPivot to complete some of the exercises. Please use MS Excel 2013 version. If you have other MS Excel versions or a MAC you might not be able to complete all assignments. This course was created by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP with an address at 300 Madison Avenue, New York, New York, 10017.

Course Syllabus

During this first week, you are going to learn about the development of data models and databases. We will cover the components of data sets and the relational database models, database keys, relationships, and joins. We will also look at a tool called PowerPivot that is used to import and prepare data to build relational models, as well as visualize data. By the end of the week, you will have a working knowledge of how to develop a data model.

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Course Introduction

Data Visualization with Advanced Excel In this course, you will design and develop your own advanced visualizations for your data. We’ll use Excel to do this, so you’ll have Excel installed and you’ll need to log in to Excel. We’ll also assume that you have some basic computer science knowledge, so you can use Excel to accomplish these calculations. Upon completing this course, you will: • Design more advanced visualizations for your data. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in visualizations. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in visualizations. • Use Excel’s built-in algorithm to create complex visualizations. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in algorithm to create complex visualizations. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in algorithm to create complex visualizations. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in algorithm to create complex visualizations. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in algorithm to create complex visualizations. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in algorithm to create complex visualizations. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in algorithm to create complex visualizations. • Explain and apply Excel’s built-in algorithm to create complex visualizations. • Explain

Course Tag

Dashboard (Business) Microsoft Excel Data Virtualization Data Visualization (DataViz)

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