Building Arduino robots and devices

Start Date: 08/09/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/arduino

About Course

For many years now, people have been improving their tools, studying the forces of nature and bringing them under control, using the energy of the nature to operate their machines. Last century is noted for the creation of machines which can operate other machines. Nowadays the creation of devices that interact with the physical world is available to anyone. Our course consists of a series of practical problems on making things that work independently: they make their own decisions, act, move, communicate with each other and people around, and control other devices. We will demonstrate how to assemble such devices and programme them using the Arduino platform as a basis. After this course, you will be able to create devices that read the data about the external world with a variety of sensors, receive and forward this data to a PC, the Internet and mobile devices, and control indexing and the movement. The creation of such devices will involve design, the study of their components, the assemblage of circuit boards, coding and diagnostics. Along with the creation of the devices themselves, you will perform visualization on a PC, create a web page that will demonstrate one of your devices, and figure out how an FDM 3D-printer is configured and how it functions. Besides those keen on robotics or looking to broaden their horizons and develop their skills, the course will also be useful to anyone facing the task of home and industrial automation, as well as to anyone engaged in industrial design, advertising and art. The course does not require any special knowledge from the participants and is open even to students of upper secondary school. Programming skills and the level of English allowing to read technical documentation would be an advantage, but this is not obligatory. The entire course is dedicated to practice, so the best way for you would be to get hold of some electronics, follow the illustrated examples and experiment on your own. The kits can be purchased here: kits.cyberphysica.ru. Taught by: Alexey Perepelkin, head of Robotics department in the Laboratory of innovative educational technologies at MIPT Taught by: Dmitry Savitsky, researcher in the Laboratory of innovative educational technologies at MIPT

Course Syllabus

Welcome to the course! During Week 1, we are going to introduce you to the course (go through the Introduction, that’s very important). Then we shall start our work: getting acquainted with Arduino, the development environment and our first components. You will learn how to assemble circuits on a breadboard and will write your first program and assemble your first device. Don’t forget about the DIY section, which is also very important

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Course Introduction

Building Arduino robots and devices This is the second course in the series on programming Arduino-based devices and robots. In this course, you will learn how to build custom Arduino-based boards using the Android OpenSource (AOSP) platform. This will help you to get familiar with the Android platform and its features. You will have a good understanding of the Arduino language and its essential values. We will develop the boards using an Arduino IDE. You will also learn how to use the firmware and the software tools to get the boards to run and to communicate with the outside world. This is the part of the course that most people skip. It is a prerequisite for most other courses in this series. This course will take about 5 weeks. You will first of all will learn how to use the IDE (integrated development environment) and the board's firmware. We will then dive into the software tools. You will also learn how to use the board's software tools to get the boards to run and to communicate with the outside world. This is the part of the course that most people skip. It is a prerequisite for other courses in this series. At the end of this course you will be able to: 1. Use the Android Studio IDE to create a working project 2. Use the Arduino IDE to create an embedded firmware 3. Write code in the Arduino programming language 4. Run the embedded firmware 5. Program the device 6. Use the board's firmware to communicate

Course Tag

Electronics Computer Programming Arduino Robotics

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Arduino The Arduino project started in 2003 as a program for students at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea in Ivrea, Italy, aiming to provide a low-cost and easy way for novices and professionals to create devices that interact with their environment using sensors and actuators. Common examples of such devices intended for beginner hobbyists include simple robots, thermostats, and motion detectors.
Arduino Many Arduino-compatible and Arduino-derived boards exist. Some are functionally equivalent to an Arduino and can be used interchangeably. Many enhance the basic Arduino by adding output drivers, often for use in school-level education, to simplify making buggies and small robots. Others are electrically equivalent but change the form factor, sometimes retaining compatibility with shields, sometimes not. Some variants use different processors, of varying compatibility.
Arduino Arduino is an open source, computer hardware and software company, project, and user community that designs and manufactures microcontroller kits for building digital devices and interactive objects that can sense and control objects in the physical world. The project's products are distributed as open-source hardware and software, which are licensed under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) or the GNU General Public License (GPL), permitting the manufacture of Arduino boards and software distribution by anyone. Arduino boards are available commercially in preassembled form, or as do-it-yourself kits.
Arduino In early 2008, the five cofounders of the Arduino project created a company, Arduino LLC, to hold the trademarks associated with Arduino. The manufacture and sale of the boards was to be done by external companies, and Arduino LLC would get a royalty from them. The founding bylaws of Arduino LLC specified that each of the five founders transfer ownership of the Arduino brand to the newly formed company.
Arduino At the World Maker Faire in New York on October 1, 2016, Arduino LLC co-founder and CEO Massimo Banzi and Arduino SRL CEO Federico Musto announced the merger of the two Arduino companies.
Arduino The original Arduino hardware was produced by the Italian company Smart Projects. Some Arduino-branded boards have been designed by the American companies SparkFun Electronics and Adafruit Industries. , 17 versions of the Arduino hardware have been commercially produced.
Bad Robots The show is made by Objective Productions and is centred on a fleet of seemingly defective and mischievous machines, devices and robots, produced by the fictional company 'Tezcorp'.
Arduino Arduino and Arduino-compatible boards use printed circuit expansion boards called "shields", which plug into the normally supplied Arduino pin headers. Shields can provide motor controls for 3D printing and other applications, Global Positioning System (GPS), Ethernet, liquid crystal display (LCD), or breadboarding (prototyping). Several shields can also be made do it yourself (DIY).
Arduino Nevertheless, an official Bill of Materials of Arduino boards has never been released by Arduino staff.
Arduino In January 2015, Arduino LLC file a lawsuit against Arduino SRL.
Arduino At the end of 2008, Gianluca Martino's company, Smart Projects, registered the Arduino trademark in Italy and kept this a secret from the other cofounders for about two years. This was revealed when the Arduino company tried to register the trademark in other areas of the world (they originally registered only in the US), and discovered that it was already registered in Italy. Negotiations with Gianluca and his firm to bring the trademark under control of the original Arduino company failed. In 2014, Smart Projects began refusing to pay royalties. They then appointed a new CEO, Mr. Musto, who renamed the company to Arduino SRL and created a website named arduino.org, copying the graphics and layout of the original Arduino.cc. This resulted in a rift in the Arduino development team. All Arduino boards are still available to consumers so the implications of this are uncertain.
Arduino The Arduino IDE supports the languages C and C++ using special rules of code structuring. The Arduino IDE supplies a software library from the Wiring project, which provides many common input and output procedures. User-written code only requires two basic functions, for starting the sketch and the main program loop, that are compiled and linked with a program stub "main()" into an executable cyclic executive program with the GNU toolchain, also included with the IDE distribution. The Arduino IDE employs the program "avrdude" to convert the executable code into a text file in hexadecimal encoding that is loaded into the Arduino board by a loader program in the board's firmware.
Arduino A minimal Arduino C/C++ sketch, as seen by the Arduino IDE programmer, consist of only two functions:
Arduino Although the hardware and software designs are freely available under copyleft licenses, the developers have requested that the name "Arduino" be exclusive to the official product and not be used for derived works without permission. The official policy document on use of the Arduino name emphasizes that the project is open to incorporating work by others into the official product. Several Arduino-compatible products commercially released have avoided the project name by using various names ending in "-duino".
Arduino Most Arduino boards contain a light-emitting diode (LED) and a load resistor connected between pin 13 and ground, which is a convenient feature for many tests and program functions. A typical program for a beginning Arduino programmer blinks an LED repeatedly.
Arduino The Arduino project provides the Arduino integrated development environment (IDE), which is a cross-platform application written in the programming language Java. It originated from the IDE for the languages "Processing" and "Wiring". It includes a code editor with features such as text cutting and pasting, searching and replacing text, automatic indenting, brace matching, and syntax highlighting, and provides simple "one-click" mechanisms to compile and upload programs to an Arduino board. It also contains a message area, a text console, a toolbar with buttons for common functions and a hierarchy of operation menus.
Arduino Arduino is open-source hardware. The hardware reference designs are distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 2.5 license and are available on the Arduino website. Layout and production files for some versions of the hardware are also available. The source code for the IDE is released under the GNU General Public License, version 2.
Arduino The Arduino board exposes most of the microcontroller's I/O pins for use by other circuits. The "Diecimila", "Duemilanove", and current "Uno" provide 14 digital I/O pins, six of which can produce pulse-width modulated signals, and six analog inputs, which can also be used as six digital I/O pins. These pins are on the top of the board, via female 0.1-inch (2.54 mm) headers. Several plug-in application shields are also commercially available. The Arduino Nano, and Arduino-compatible Bare Bones Board and Boarduino boards may provide male header pins on the underside of the board that can plug into solderless breadboards.
Arduino A program written with the IDE for Arduino is called a "sketch". Sketches are saved on the development computer as text files with the file extension ".ino". Arduino Software (IDE) pre-1.0 saved sketches with the extension ".pde".
Arduino The initial Arduino core team consisted of Massimo Banzi, David Cuartielles, Tom Igoe, Gianluca Martino, and David Mellis, but Barragán was not invited to participate.