Corporate Finance I: Measuring and Promoting Value Creation

Start Date: 11/06/2018

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/corporate-finance-measure-success

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About Course

In this course you will learn how to use key finance principles to understand and measure business success and to identify and promote true value creation. You will learn how to use accounting information to form key financial ratios to measure a company’s financial health and to manage a company's short-term and long-term liquidity needs. You will also learn how to use valuation techniques to make sound business investment and acquisition decisions. Finally, you will learn how to incorporate risk and uncertainty into investment decisions and how to evaluate the performance of existing investments. Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to: • Understand how companies make investment decisions that create value for shareholders • Use accounting statements to measure the financial health of a company • Forecast and manage a company’s short- and long-term liquidity needs • Measure the contribution of a new project or acquisition to shareholder value • Incorporate risk into investment decisions using the appropriate discount rates • Evaluate the performance of a company or divisions of a company This course was previously entitled Financial Evaluation and Strategy: Corporate Finance. The course received an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 based on 177 reviews over the period of September 2015 through August 2016. A detailed breakdown of ratings and reviews received for the prior version of the course, which is identical in content to the current course, is provided in the course orientation page. This course is part of the iMBA offered by the University of Illinois, a flexible, fully-accredited online MBA at an incredibly competitive price. For more information, please see the Resource page in this course and onlinemba.illinois.edu.

Course Syllabus

In Module 1, we will discuss the objectives of the corporation. We will introduce the concept of shareholder value and discuss the pros and cons of maximizing stock prices. We will then learn how to calculate financial ratios that measure concepts such as liquidity, leverage, and profitability. We will work with accounting statements and financial data from real world companies and learn how to use this data to measure the financial health of companies and make comparisons with competitors.

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Course Introduction

In this course you will learn how to use key finance principles to understand and measure business s

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Article Example
Corporate finance Corporate finance is the area of finance dealing with the sources of funding and the capital structure of corporations, the actions that managers take to increase the value of the firm to the shareholders, and the tools and analysis used to allocate financial resources. The primary goal of corporate finance is to maximize or increase shareholder value. Although it is in principle different from managerial finance which studies the financial management of all firms, rather than corporations alone, the main concepts in the study of corporate finance are applicable to the financial problems of all kinds of firms.
Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies is a textbook on valuation, corporate finance, and investment management by McKinsey & Company. The book was initially published in 1990 and is now available in its sixth edition.
Principles of Corporate Finance The book covers a wide range of aspects relevant to corporate finance, illustrated by examples and case studies. The text starts with explaining basic finance concepts of value, risk, and other principles. Then the issues become more and more complex, from project analysis and net present value calculations, to debt policy and option valuation. Other discussed topics include mergers and acquisitions, principal–agent problems, credit risk, working capital management, etc. The book concludes with a discussion on the current limitations of the corporate finance theory.
Corporate finance In general, each project's value will be estimated using a discounted cash flow (DCF) valuation, and the opportunity with the highest value, as measured by the resultant net present value (NPV) will be selected (applied to Corporate Finance by Joel Dean in 1951). This requires estimating the size and timing of all of the "incremental" cash flows resulting from the project. Such future cash flows are then discounted to determine their "present value" (see Time value of money). These present values are then summed, and this sum net of the initial investment outlay is the NPV. See Financial modeling.
Principles of Corporate Finance Principles of Corporate Finance is a reference work on the corporate finance theory edited by Richard Brealey, Stewart Myers, and Franklin Allen. The book is one of the leading texts that describes the theory and practice of corporate finance. It was initially published in October 1980 and now is available in its 12th edition. "Principles of Corporate Finance" has earned loyalty both as a classroom tool and as a professional reference book.
Corporate finance Use of the term "corporate finance" varies considerably across the world. In the United States it is used, as above, to describe activities, analytical methods and techniques that deal with many aspects of a company's finances and capital. In the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries, the terms "corporate finance" and "corporate financier" tend to be associated with investment banking – i.e. with transactions in which capital is raised for the corporation. These may include
Corporate finance The terms corporate finance and corporate financier are also associated with investment banking. The typical role of an investment bank is to evaluate the company's financial needs and raise the appropriate type of capital that best fits those needs. Thus, the terms "corporate finance" and "corporate financier" may be associated with transactions in which capital is raised in order to create, develop, grow or acquire businesses. Recent legal and regulatory developments in the U.S. will likely alter the makeup of the group of arrangers and financiers willing to arrange and provide financing for certain highly leveraged transactions.
Finance Directorates Prior to the creation of the Finance Directorates in 2010, many of their responsibilities were undertaken by the Scottish Government Finance and Corporate Services Directorates and prior to 2007 by the Scottish Executive Finance and Central Services Department.
Value measuring methodology Value measuring methodology (or VMM) is a tool that helps financial planners balance both tangible and intangible values when making investment decisions, and monitor benefits.
Corporate finance Managing the corporation's working capital position to sustain ongoing business operations is referred to as "working capital management". These involve managing the relationship between a firm's short-term assets and its short-term liabilities. In general this is as follows: As above, the goal of Corporate Finance is the maximization of firm value. In the context of long term, capital budgeting, firm value is enhanced through appropriately selecting and funding NPV positive investments. These investments, in turn, have implications in terms of cash flow and cost of capital. The goal of Working Capital (i.e. short term) management is therefore to ensure that the firm is able to operate, and that it has sufficient cash flow to service long-term debt, and to satisfy both maturing short-term debt and upcoming operational expenses. In so doing, firm value is enhanced when, and if, the return on capital exceeds the cost of capital; See Economic value added (EVA). Managing short term finance and long term finance is one task of a modern CFO.
Corporate finance This area is related to corporate finance in two ways. Firstly, firm exposure to business and market risk is a direct result of previous capital financial investments. Secondly, both disciplines share the goal of enhancing, or preserving, firm value. There is a fundamental debate relating to "Risk Management" and shareholder value. Per the Modigliani and Miller framework, hedging is irrelevant since diversified shareholders are assumed to not care about firm-specific risks, whereas, on the other hand hedging is seen to create value in that it reduces the probability of financial distress. A further question, is the shareholder's desire to optimize risk versus taking exposure to pure risk (a risk event that only has a negative side, such as loss of life or limb). The debate links the value of risk management in a market to the cost of bankruptcy in that market.
Corporate finance Risk management is the process of measuring risk and then developing and implementing strategies to manage ("hedge") that risk. Financial risk management, typically, is focused on the impact on corporate value due to adverse changes in commodity prices, interest rates, foreign exchange rates and stock prices (market risk). It will also play an important role in short term cash- and treasury management; see above. It is common for large corporations to have risk management teams; often these overlap with the internal audit function. While it is impractical for small firms to have a formal risk management function, many still apply risk management informally. See also Enterprise risk management.
Corporate finance This "capital budgeting" is the planning of value-adding, long-term corporate financial projects relating to investments funded through and affecting the firm's capital structure. Management must allocate the firm's limited resources between competing opportunities (projects).
Corporate finance Achieving the goals of corporate finance requires that any corporate investment be financed appropriately. The sources of financing are, generically, capital self-generated by the firm and capital from external funders, obtained by issuing new debt and equity (and hybrid- or convertible securities). As above, since both hurdle rate and cash flows (and hence the riskiness of the firm) will be affected, the financing mix will impact the valuation of the firm. There are two interrelated considerations here:
Finance and Corporate Services Directorates The Scottish Government Finance and Corporate Services Directorates were a set of directorates of the Scottish Government. They were responsible for delivering ministerial support, human resources, legal services and procurement to the other directorates. In December 2010 these functions were taken on by the Governance and Communities Directorate and the Finance Directorate.
Corporate finance In conjunction with NPV, there are several other measures used as (secondary) selection criteria in corporate finance. These are visible from the DCF and include discounted payback period, IRR, Modified IRR, equivalent annuity, capital efficiency, and ROI. Alternatives (complements) to NPV include Residual Income Valuation, MVA / EVA (Joel Stern, Stern Stewart & Co) and APV (Stewart Myers). See "list of valuation topics".
Journal of Applied Corporate Finance The Journal of Applied Corporate Finance is a quarterly academic journal covering research in corporate finance, including risk management, corporate strategy, corporate governance, and capital structure. It also features roundtable discussions among corporate executives and academics on topics such as integrity in financial reporting. It was established in 1988 and is published by Wiley-Blackwell. The editor-in-chief is Donald H. Chew, Jr. From 2004 to 2013, the journal was owned by Morgan Stanley, but is now owned and operated by its editors and by Carl Ferenbach, a retired private equity investor.
Corporate services In the United Kingdom, the public audit agencies produced a report in May 2007 called "Value for Money in public sector corporate services". This provides performance indicators in five categories: Finance, Human Resources, Information & Communication Technology, Procurement, and Estates Management.
Sustainable Value Sustainable value is a way of managing and measuring sustainability performance. The concept was developed by researchers who are working today for Euromed Management School (Marseille/France) and the IZT - Institute for Futures Studies and Technology Assessment (Berlin/Germany). To date Sustainable Value is primarily used to assess corporate sustainability performance.
Cavendish Corporate Finance Cavendish Corporate Finance LLP, commonly referred to as Cavendish, is an independent firm advising exclusively on sell side M&A. Cavendish specialises in a variety of sectors including; financial services, industrials, and healthcare. The company advises a broad variety of clients including; private companies, financial institutions and fully listed public companies, with transactions generally falling in the mid-market value range (£10 million to £200 million).