Basic Data Descriptors, Statistical Distributions, and Application to Business Decisions

Start Date: 10/11/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/descriptive-statistics-statistical-distributions-business-application

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About Course

The ability to understand and apply Business Statistics is becoming increasingly important in the industry. A good understanding of Business Statistics is a requirement to make correct and relevant interpretations of data. Lack of knowledge could lead to erroneous decisions which could potentially have negative consequences for a firm. This course is designed to introduce you to Business Statistics. We begin with the notion of descriptive statistics, which is summarizing data using a few numbers. Different categories of descriptive measures are introduced and discussed along with the Excel functions to calculate them. The notion of probability or uncertainty is introduced along with the concept of a sample and population data using relevant business examples. This leads us to various statistical distributions along with their Excel functions which are then used to model or approximate business processes. You get to apply these descriptive measures of data and various statistical distributions using easy-to-follow Excel based examples which are demonstrated throughout the course. To successfully complete course assignments, students must have access to Microsoft Excel. ________________________________________ WEEK 1 Module 1: Basic Data Descriptors In this module you will get to understand, calculate and interpret various descriptive or summary measures of data. These descriptive measures summarize and present data using a few numbers. Appropriate Excel functions to do these calculations are introduced and demonstrated. Topics covered include: • Categories of descriptive data • Measures of central tendency, the mean, median, mode, and their interpretations and calculations • Measures of spread-in-data, the range, interquartile-range, standard deviation and variance • Box plots • Interpreting the standard deviation measure using the rule-of-thumb and Chebyshev’s theorem ________________________________________ WEEK 2 Module 2: Descriptive Measures of Association, Probability, and Statistical Distributions This module presents the covariance and correlation measures and their respective Excel functions. You get to understand the notion of causation versus correlation. The module then introduces the notion of probability and random variables and starts introducing statistical distributions. Topics covered include: • Measures of association, the covariance and correlation measures; causation versus correlation • Probability and random variables; discrete versus continuous data • Introduction to statistical distributions ________________________________________ WEEK 3 Module 3: The Normal Distribution This module introduces the Normal distribution and the Excel function to calculate probabilities and various outcomes from the distribution. Topics covered include: • Probability density function and area under the curve as a measure of probability • The Normal distribution (bell curve), NORM.DIST, NORM.INV functions in Excel ________________________________________ WEEK 4 Module 4: Working with Distributions, Normal, Binomial, Poisson In this module, you'll see various applications of the Normal distribution. You will also get introduced to the Binomial and Poisson distributions. The Central Limit Theorem is introduced and explained in the context of understanding sample data versus population data and the link between the two. Topics covered include: • Various applications of the Normal distribution • The Binomial and Poisson distributions • Sample versus population data; the Central Limit Theorem

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Course Introduction

Basic Data Descriptors, Statistical Distributions, and Application to Business Decisions The course focuses on the business decision making process, with a particular emphasis on the use of basic data descriptions and quantitative tests of business decisions. The course will not discuss business cases or specific business decisions, but it will focus on the use of basic data descriptions and a test statistic for a business decision. The course will not cover formulas or other specific topics, but it will cover the use of a business decision formula in the form of a vector calculus. The course will also not discuss business cases or specific business decisions, but it will cover the use of basic logistic regression models for simple models. The course will also not discuss the use of formal methods or specific regression specifications for businesses to make business decisions, but it will cover the linearization of a model and the alternative of linear regression versus one of exponential or logistic regression. The course will also not discuss the probabilistic nature of business decisions, but it will cover the use of choice and random variables in a decision. Business decisions are typically made in a matter of seconds, and the use of statistical tests and random variables often gives the impression of a well-informed business decision, even though the decisions are not always made that way. Learning Outcomes. By the end of this course, you will be able to: -integrate basic logistic regression models into decision making process -describe the business decision making process in general and the business decisions made by a business -use a business decision formula in the

Course Tag

Statistics Statistical Analysis Normal Distribution Poisson Distribution

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