Financial Accounting: Advanced Topics

Start Date: 02/23/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/financial-accounting-advanced

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About Course

In this course, you will explore advanced topics in financial accounting. You will start your journey with accounting for assets with more than one-year life. You will learn in detail how firms account for fixed assets. You will then move to financing of assets and discuss accounting for liabilities. The course will continue with an in-depth exploration of shareholders’ equity. Finally, you will critically evaluate preparation, components, and analysis of cash flows statement. Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to: • Account for fixed assets • Understand accounting for liabilities • Evaluate shareholders’ equity section of a balance sheet • Understand preparation and information provided by cash flows statement This course is part of the iMBA offered by the University of Illinois, a flexible, fully-accredited online MBA at an incredibly competitive price. For more information, please see the Resource page in this course and onlinemba.illinois.edu.

Course Syllabus

Long-term assets, assets that can be converted into cash in a time period of more than one year, constitute a large portion of a balance sheet for a lot of public companies. Understanding accounting for long-term assets will help you uncover how these accounts change over time, their valuation, and their usefulness in managerial decision making.

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Course Introduction

Financial Accounting: Advanced Topics This course prepares you to understand the advanced material in financial accounting. You’ll learn how to format your financial statements for easy reading, add and subtracting of assets and liabilities, valuation of assets, special purpose vehicles and their ownership, valuation of liabilities, and cost allocation. You’ll also learn how to use accounting standards in order to give you a head start in understanding what is going on in your business. By the end of this course, you’ll understand how to use accounting statements to give you a head start in understanding what is going on in your business. You’ll also be able to use this knowledge to make smarter decisions about your business.Module 1 Module 2 Module 3 Module 4 Financial Accounting: Basic Topics This course is designed to cover the material covered in the four previous courses in the specialization: Financial Accounting: Concepts, Measurement, Analysis, and Assessments. In addition, this course will focus on the most important conceptual model used to give you a head start in understanding business. You’ll learn how to use a balance sheet to help you make decisions about your business, what assets and liabilities you have, and how to figure out your financial situation. Along the way, you’ll also learn a lot of practical practical practical lessons that will help you become an effective professional in financial accounting. This course is designed to give you a

Course Tag

Cash Flow Financial Accounting Cash Flow Statement Financial Statement

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