Interactivity with JavaScript

Start Date: 07/05/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/javascript

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About Course

If you want to take your website to the next level, the ability to incorporate interactivity is a must. But adding some of these types of capabilities requires a stronger programming language than HTML5 or CSS3, and JavaScript can provide just what you need. With just a basic understanding of the language, you can create a page that will react to common events such as page loads, mouse clicks & movements, and even keyboard input. This course will introduce you to the basics of the JavaScript language. We will cover concepts such as variables, looping, functions, and even a little bit about debugging tools. You will understand how the Document Object Model (DOM) is used by JavaScript to identify and modify specific parts of your page. After the course, learners will be able to react to DOM Events and dynamically alter the contents and style of their page. The class will culminate in a final project - the creation of an interactive HTML5 form that accepts and verifies input. This is the third course in the Web Design For Everybody specialization. A basic understanding of HTML and CSS is expected when you enroll in this class. Additional courses focus on enhancing the styling with responsive design and completing a capstone project.

Course Syllabus

If you haven't use a traditional programming language before, this first week is key. Before we begin with the how, we will talk about the why, mainly why we want to use JavaScript. The main reason is that it is very easy for JavaScript to work with the DOM. And easy is always a great way to start. Speaking of starting out, it is also always more fun when our code actually does something we can see, so we will jump quickly into different ways we can generate output. It won't be flashy yet, but it will be a great way to get your feet wet with traditional programming. After that we go back to the basics of how a computer uses data. We begin with variables, expressions, and operators.

Deep Learning Specialization on Coursera

Course Introduction

Interactivity with JavaScript This course provides an introduction to the basics of interacting with JavaScript programs via the mouse and keyboard. In particular, we will cover common programming and object-oriented programming mechanisms that you will need to know to use in your daily activities on the web. You will also learn about HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript object-oriented programming. This is the second course in the specialization. We will go deeper into JavaScript Object-Oriented Programming later on in this course.Interactivity with JavaScript DOM manipulation DOM hiding DOM events JavaScript Object-Oriented Programming JavaScript is a very powerful language, and an extremely popular one at that. This course gives you a deep understanding of the basics of programming in JavaScript, and how to apply those concepts in your everyday programming. You will quickly find yourself programming in an unusual environment: inside JavaScript objects and functions, and you will begin to understand how to organize your code correctly. You will also learn how to use object-oriented frameworks to design your objects and functions, and how to maintain your code style and maintain backward compatibility. You’ll also learn how to use features of the JavaScript standard, including functions, and begin to see the use of classes and inheritance in JavaScript. This course is intended for people who are interested in learning JavaScript Object-Oriented Programming, or OOP. You may not have much experience using

Course Tag

Document Object Model (DOM) JavaScript Web Development

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Interactivity Multiple views on interactivity exist. In the "contingency view" of interactivity, there are three levels:
Interactivity Across the many fields concerned with interactivity, including information science, computer science, human-computer interaction, communication, and industrial design, there is little agreement over the meaning of the term interactivity, although all are related to interaction with computers and other machines with a user interface.
Interactivity Media theorist Fernando Arturo Torres defined interactivity as, "a particular medium's ability to facilitate the properties necessary in an ideal conversation" ("Towards A Universal Theory Of Media Interactivity: Developing A Proper Context," 1995, "Definition of Interactivity," para. 1). His research determined that interactivity should be defined by "how well a medium facilitates two-way communication rather than by the technology of the medium."
Interactivity Human communication is the basic example of interactive communication which involves two different processes; human to human interactivity and human to computer interactivity. Human-Human interactivity is the communication between people.
Interactivity One body of research has made a strong distinction between interaction and interactivity. As the suffix 'ity' is used to form nouns that denote a quality or condition, this body of research has defined interactivity as the 'quality or condition of interaction'. These researchers suggest that the distinction between interaction and interactivity is important since interaction may be present in any given setting, but the quality of the interaction varies from low and high.
Interactivity The term "look and feel" is often used to refer to the specifics of a computer system's user interface. Using this metaphor, the "look" refers to its visual design, while the "feel" refers to its interactivity. Indirectly this can be regarded as an informal definition of interactivity.
Interactivity New Media academic Vincent Maher defines interactivity as "the relation constituted by a symbolic interface between its referential, objective functionality and the subject."
Interactivity For a more detailed discussion of how interactivity has been conceptualized in the human-computer interaction literature, and how the phenomenology of the French philosopher Merleau-Ponty can shed light on the user experience, see (Svanaes 2000).
Interactivity An artifact’s interactivity is best perceived through use. A bystander can imagine how it would be like to use an artifact by watching others use it, but it is only through actual use that its interactivity is fully experienced and "felt". This is due to the kinesthetic nature of the interactive experience. It is similar to the difference between watching someone drive a car and actually driving it. It is only through the driving that one can experience and "feel" how this car differs from others.
JavaScript All modern Web browsers support JavaScript with built-in interpreters.
Rapid interactivity Rapid interactivity is a method for rapidly developing interactive learning technologies.
JavaScript jQuery is a popular JavaScript library designed to simplify DOM-oriented client-side HTML scripting along with offering cross-browser compatibility because various browsers respond differently to certain vanilla JavaScript code.
Interactivity Web page authors can integrate JavaScript coding to create interactive web pages. Sliders, date pickers, drag and dropping are just some of the many enhancements that can be provided.
JavaScript JavaScript supports much of the structured programming syntax from C (e.g., if statements, while loops, switch statements, do while loops, etc.). One partial exception is scoping: JavaScript originally had only function scoping with var. ECMAScript 2015 added a let keyword for block scoping, meaning JavaScript now has both function and block scoping. Like C, JavaScript makes a distinction between expressions and statements. One syntactic difference from C is automatic semicolon insertion, which allows the semicolons that would normally terminate statements to be omitted.
Interactivity In the context of communication between a human and an artifact, interactivity refers to the artifact’s interactive behaviour as experienced by the human user. This is different from other aspects of the artifact such as its visual appearance, its internal working, and the meaning of the signs it might mediate. For example, the interactivity of an iPod is not its physical shape and colour (its so-called "design"), its ability to play music, or its storage capacity—it is the behaviour of its user interface as experienced by its user. This includes the way the user moves their finger on its input wheel, the way this allows the selection of a tune in the playlist, and the way the user controls the volume.
JavaScript JavaScript is also used in environments that are not Web-based, such as PDF documents, site-specific browsers, and desktop widgets. Newer and faster JavaScript virtual machines (VMs) and platforms built upon them have also increased the popularity of JavaScript for server-side Web applications. On the client side, developers have traditionally implemented JavaScript as an interpreted language, but more recent browsers perform just-in-time compilation. Programmers also use JavaScript in video-game development, in crafting desktop and mobile applications, and in server-side network programming with run-time environments such as Node.js.
JavaScript A JavaScript engine (also known as JavaScript interpreter or JavaScript implementation) is an interpreter that interprets JavaScript source code and executes the script accordingly. The first JavaScript engine was created by Brendan Eich at Netscape, for the Netscape Navigator Web browser. The engine, code-named SpiderMonkey, is implemented in C. It has since been updated (in JavaScript 1.5) to conform to ECMAScript 3. The Rhino engine, created primarily by Norris Boyd (formerly at Netscape, now at Google) is a JavaScript implementation in Java. Rhino, like SpiderMonkey, is ECMAScript 3 compliant.
JavaScript JavaScript has become one of the most popular programming languages on the Web. Initially, however, many professional programmers denigrated the language because, among other reasons, its target audience consisted of Web authors and other such "amateurs". The advent of Ajax returned JavaScript to the spotlight and brought more professional programming attention. The result was a proliferation of comprehensive frameworks and libraries, improved JavaScript programming practices, and increased usage of JavaScript outside Web browsers, as seen by the proliferation of server-side JavaScript platforms.
JavaScript A Web browser is by far the most common host environment for JavaScript. Web browsers typically create "host objects" to represent the DOM in JavaScript. The Web server is another common host environment. A JavaScript Web server would typically expose host objects representing HTTP request and response objects, which a JavaScript program could then interrogate and manipulate to dynamically generate Web pages.
JavaScript OSA OS X Yosemite introduced JavaScript for Automation (JXA): system-wide support for scripting with JavaScript, built upon JavaScriptCore and the Open Scripting Architecture. It features an Objective-C bridge which enables entire Cocoa applications to be programmed in JavaScript.