Machine Learning: Regression

Start Date: 11/17/2019

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/ml-regression

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Course Syllabus

Regression is one of the most important and broadly used machine learning and statistics tools out there. It allows you to make predictions from data by learning the relationship between features of your data and some observed, continuous-valued response. Regression is used in a massive number of applications ranging from predicting stock prices to understanding gene regulatory networks.

This introduction to the course provides you with an overview of the topics we will cover and the background knowledge and resources we assume you have.

Deep Learning Specialization on Coursera

Course Introduction

In this course, you will explore regularized linear regression models for the task of prediction and feature selection. You will be able to handle very large sets of features and select between models of various complexity. You will also analyze the impact of aspects of your data -- such as outliers -- on your selected models and predictions.

Course Tag

Machine Learning Regression Machine Learning Model Regression Model Linear Regression Ridge Regression Lasso (Statistics) Regression Analysis

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