Tropical Parasitology: Protozoans, Worms, Vectors and Human Diseases

Start Date: 07/05/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/parasitology

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About Course

This course provides students an understanding of important human parasitic diseases, including their life cycles, vectors of transmission, distribution and epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations, treatment, and prevention and control. Tropical Parasitology is taught by faculty from an area highly impacted by tropical parasites- the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College in Moshi, Tanzania. The faculty include Drs. Frank Mosha and Mramba Nyindo (and two lecturers, Drs. Johnson Matowo and Jovin Kitau). Dr. John Bartlett, Professor of Medicine, Global Health and Nursing at Duke University, joins his faculty colleagues in this effort.

Course Syllabus

Welcome to Tropical Parasitology: Protozoans, Worms, Vectors, and Human Diseases! In this course, students will develop an understanding of important human parasitic diseases, including their life cycles, vectors of transmission, distribution and epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations, treatment, and prevention and control. Tropical Parasitology is taught by Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College faculty -- Drs. Frank Mosha and Mramba Nyindo (and two lecturers, Drs. Johnson Matowo and Jovin Kitau). They are joined by Dr. John Bartlett, Professor of Medicine, Global Health and Nursing at Duke University. To get started, view the video "Welcome to Tropical Parasitology," read the Course Overview, read about how the course is structured in Course Clusters, and review the Course Resources. Then move on to study the first cluster, Protozoans. Please note that the Protozoans cluster constitutes the largest content cluster in the course, and we have allocated 3 weeks to complete the work for this cluster. The other course clusters will take one week (each) to complete. We hope you enjoy the course, and we look forward to your contributions to our learning community.

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Course Introduction

Tropical Parasitology: Protozoans, Worms, Vectors and Human Diseases This course provides an introduction to the many parasites that are common in tropical and sub-tropical environments. These include protozoan parasites, Vector-borne diseases, and human parasites.Course Overview Plantar Fasitis Tropical Parasitology: Arthropods, Worms, Vectors and Human Diseases Viruses and Infections Tropical Herpes: Diagnosis and Treatment This course is geared toward the general public who is looking for general knowledge of herpes simplex. Perceived risk factors for herpes, such as sexual behavior, is a topic of current discussion. Specific diagnosis is not recommended as the risk of herpes infection and disease progression are high. Specific treatment options include antiviral medications, topical creams/sprays, and surgical procedures. Upon completion, you will be able to: 1. Explain the pathology of herpes simplex 2. Describe the various types of herpes simplex 3. Diagnose and treat the symptoms and signs of herpes simplex 4. Apply a topical antiviral medication based on the available evidence 5. Apply a topical creams or sprays based on the available evidence 6. Select an appropriate treatment for different situations and BACHELORMES .7. Identify common cause and treatment modalities for different situations This course is part of the EIT Health Systemat

Course Tag

Disease Control Disease Biology Parasitology Microbiology

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
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