Positioning: What you need for a successful Marketing Strategy

Start Date: 02/23/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/positioning

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About Course

Positioning is the heart of any Marketing Strategy, the core that you must get right. It does not matter whether you start with a clearly defined target group or with a differential value proposition: you will need end up with a clear segment or segments upon which we build our Marketing Plan. In this course - the second in our Marketing Strategy Specialization - IE professor Ignacio Gafo will guide you through the essential stages of this key marketing process, starting with the basic elements that you will require and deciding on the market segmentation and marketing. The course progresses to examine the key market trends that you will encounter and will provide you with a handy practical toolbox of skills. The course features interviews with industry professionals as well as on location videos where we quiz members of the public on their attitude towards this key concept. After this course you will be in no doubt of where to position your product and which segment you are going to attempt to attract.

Course Syllabus

In the second module, the focus is on the first element of positioning: The market segmentation. During the module the segmentation concept is covered, together with the reasons for segmenting, the criteria and models that could be used for running the segmentation.

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Course Introduction

Positioning: What you need for a successful Marketing Strategy In this course you will develop a clear understanding of the most important elements of a successful marketing strategy. By the end of this course, you will have a clear picture of what is required to be successful in every aspect of marketing strategy, including but not limited to: positioning yourself, your brand, your product or service, and your market. We will cover topics such as positioning yourself in the global market, positioning yourself in your country or market, positioning yourself in your industry/company, positioning yourself in your company or organization, and positioning yourself in the competitive market. In this course, we will focus on the most important elements to a successful marketing strategy: positioning yourself, your brand, your product or service, and your market. We will cover topics such as positioning yourself in the global market, positioning yourself in your country or market, positioning yourself in your industry/company, positioning yourself in your company or organization, and positioning yourself in the competitive market. You will have a very good understanding of the most important elements of marketing strategy, and will have a very good understanding of the different marketing strategies that are used in different countries, companies, and organizations. You will also have a very good understanding of the different formats and the different levels of strategy: regular marketing action plan, action plan, strategic plan, and action plan. You will have a very good understanding of the different marketing strategies that are used in different countries, companies, and organizations. You will also have

Course Tag

Market Segmentation Marketing Process Positioning (Marketing) Value Proposition

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Positioning (marketing) Positioning is one of the most powerful marketing concepts. Originally, positioning focused on the product and with Ries and Trout grew to include building a product's reputation and ranking among competitor's products. Primarily, it is about "the place a brand occupies in the mind of its target audience". Positioning is now a regular marketing activity or strategy. A national positioning strategy can often be used, or modified slightly, as a tool to accommodate entering into foreign markets.
Positioning (marketing) Positioning is part of the broader marketing strategy which includes three basic decision levels, namely segmentation, targeting and positioning, sometimes known as the S-T-P approach:
Marketing strategy Marketing strategy should not be confused with a marketing objective or mission. For example, a goal may be to become the market leader, perhaps in a specific niche; a mission may be something along the lines of "to serve customers with honor and dignity"; in contrast, a marketing strategy describes how a firm will achieve the stated goal in a way which is consistent with the mission, perhaps by detailed plans for how it might build a referral network, for example. Strategy varies by type of market. A well-established firm in a mature market will likely have a different strategy than a start-up. Plans usually involve monitoring, to assess progress, and prepare for contingencies if problems arise. You should also write a marketing strategy when starting your own business.
Positioning (marketing) David Ogilvy noted that while there was no real consensus as to the meaning of positioning among marketing experts, his definition is what a "product does, and who it is for". For instance, Dove has been successfully positioned as bars of soap for women with dry hands, vs. a product for men with dirty hands.
Positioning (marketing) A segmentation-driven marketing strategy can help companies design products that are responsive, promotional tactics and campaigns developments that are effective, scale of competitive positions and fine-tune current marketing plans or ideas. Marketers must also recognize that a segmentation-driven strategy is generally more costly than mass marketing and brings a major commitment by management for "customer-oriented planning, research, implementation, and control".
Marketing strategy If a company adopts this type of market strategy, they design a separate marketing mix for each customer.
Positioning (marketing) According to Stephen A. Fox, Al Ries and Jack Trout "resurrected the concept and made it their trademark. They stated that positioning means focusing on the consumer, rather than oneself. In addition to the previous focus on the product, positioning now includes building a brand's reputation and competitive standing. Ries and Trout, former advertising executives, published articles about positioning in "Industrial Marketing" in 1969 and "Advertising Age" in 1972. By the early 1970s, positioning became a popular word with marketers, especially those in advertising and promotion. In 1981, Ries and Trout published their classic book, "Positioning—The Battle for Your Mind". John P. Maggard notes that positioning provides planners with a valuable conceptual vehicle for implementation of more meaningful and productive marketing strategies.
Marketing strategy An organization's strategy combines all of its marketing goals into one comprehensive plan. A good marketing strategy should be drawn from market research and focus on the product mix in order to achieve the maximum profit and sustain the business. The marketing strategy is the foundation of a marketing plan.
Positioning (marketing) It has also be called product positioning, but that is a limiting description because it focuses on the product itself, while the positioning marketing technique focuses on the minds of the consumers.
Positioning (marketing) The precise origins of the positioning concept are unclear. Cano (2003), Schwartzkopf (2008) and others have argued that the concepts of market segmentation and positioning were central to the tacit knowledge that informed brand advertising from the 1920s, but did not become codified in marketing textbooks and journal articles until the 1950s and 60s. Cano, for example, has argued that marketing practitioners followed competitor-based approaches to both market segmentation and product positioning in the first decades of the twentieth century; long before these concepts were introduced into the marketing literature in the 1950s and 60s.
Marketing strategy The 4P’s also known as Price, Product, Place and Promotion is a strategy that originated from the single P meaning Price. This strategy was designed as an easy way to turn marketing planning into practice. This strategy is used to find and meet the consumers needs and can be used for long term or short term purposes. The proportions of the marketing mix can be altered to meet different requirements for each product produced, similar to altering ingredients when baking a cake.
Segmenting and positioning Below a generic process-data model "is given" for the whole process of segmenting and positioning as a basis of deciding on the most effective marketing strategy and marketing mix.
What You Need (song) "What You Need" is a song recorded by the Australian band INXS. It is the leadoff track from their 1985 album, "Listen Like Thieves". "What You Need" was the first single off the album in Australia and New Zealand, while it was in USA and Europe the second single after "This Time" and was the band's first American Top Ten hit, peaking at #5 on the "Billboard" Hot 100 singles chart.
Take What You Need Take What You Need is the thirteenth studio album by Robin Trower, and the second to feature Davey Pattison on lead vocals.
Social pull marketing Social Pull Marketing is the adaptation of the traditional Push–pull strategy marketing concepts to Social Media Websites. It utilizes the traditional Pull concept for a new way of Social Media Marketing. To get a basic understanding of what Social Pull Marketing is, just think of people friending you rather than you friending people.
Positioning (marketing) As advertising executives in their early careers, both Ries and Trout would have been exposed to the positioning concept via their work. Ries and Trout codified the positioning concept with the publication of a series of articles published in "Industrial Marketing" in 1969 and "Advertising Age" in 1972. By the late 1960s and early 1970s, the concept of positioning began to spread out of the advertising community and into the marketing community following the publication of Ries and Trout's articles. Their articles were to become highly influential. By the early 1970s, positioning became a popular word with marketers, especially those that were working in the area of advertising and promotion and in 1981 Ries and Trout published their classic book, "Positioning—The Battle for Your Mind". (McGraw-Hill 1981) The concept enjoys ongoing currency among both advertisers and marketers as suggested by Maggard who notes that positioning provides planners with a valuable conceptual vehicle, which is effectively used to make various strategy techniques more meaningful and more productive.
What You Need (song) The song was covered by "Weird Al" Yankovic in his 1986 polka "Polka Party!". A remixed version of "What You Need" was featured in the soundtrack of sports video game "FIFA Football 2005".
Marketing strategy Strategic planning typically begins with a scan of the business environment, both internal and external, which includes understanding strategic constraints. It is generally necessary to try to grasp many aspects of the external environment, including technological, economic, cultural, political and legal aspects. Goals are chosen. Then, a marketing strategy or marketing plan is an explanation of what specific actions will be taken over time to achieve the objectives. Plans can be extended to cover many years, with sub-plans for each year, although as the speed of change in the merchandising environment quickens, time horizons are becoming shorter. Ideally, strategies are both dynamic and interactive, partially planned and partially unplanned, to enable a firm to react to unforeseen developments while trying to keep focused on a specific pathway; generally, a longer time frame is preferred. There are simulations such as customer lifetime value models which can help marketers conduct "what-if" analyses to forecast what might happen based on possible actions, and gauge how specific actions might affect such variables as the revenue-per-customer and the churn rate. Strategies often specify how to adjust the marketing mix; firms can use tools such as Marketing Mix Modeling to help them decide how to allocate scarce resources for different media, as well as how to allocate funds across a portfolio of brands. In addition, firms can conduct analyses of performance, customer analysis, competitor analysis, and target market analysis. A key aspect of marketing strategy is often to keep marketing consistent with a company's overarching mission statement.
Marketing strategy Marketing strategy has the fundamental goal of increasing sales and achieving a sustainable competitive advantage. Marketing strategy includes all basic, short-term, and long-term activities in the field of marketing that deal with the analysis of the strategic initial situation of a company and the formulation, evaluation and selection of market-oriented strategies and therefore contribute to the goals of the company and its marketing objectives.
I Need You for Christmas "I Need You for Christmas" is a promotional song recorded by Romanian dance/pop vocalist Inna from her Christmas compilation album "I Need You For Christmas (2009)". It was written and produced by Inna's native producing trio Play & Win. The song is one of the two Christmas songs she brought out in December 2009, along with her version of Romanian popular carol "O, ce veste minunată!". While acting as the lead single for her compilation, "I Need You For Christmas" became a less successful single for Inna in Eastern Europe. A music video for the track was filmed in the AFI Palace in Cotroceni, Romania and premiered late 2009