Predictive Modeling and Analytics

Start Date: 02/23/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/predictive-modeling-analytics

Explore 1600+ online courses from top universities. Join Coursera today to learn data science, programming, business strategy, and more.

About Course

Welcome to the second course in the Data Analytics for Business specialization! This course will introduce you to some of the most widely used predictive modeling techniques and their core principles. By taking this course, you will form a solid foundation of predictive analytics, which refers to tools and techniques for building statistical or machine learning models to make predictions based on data. You will learn how to carry out exploratory data analysis to gain insights and prepare data for predictive modeling, an essential skill valued in the business. You’ll also learn how to summarize and visualize datasets using plots so that you can present your results in a compelling and meaningful way. We will use a practical predictive modeling software, XLMiner, which is a popular Excel plug-in. This course is designed for anyone who is interested in using data to gain insights and make better business decisions. The techniques discussed are applied in all functional areas within business organizations including accounting, finance, human resource management, marketing, operations, and strategic planning. The expected prerequisites for this course include a prior working knowledge of Excel, introductory level algebra, and basic statistics.

Course Syllabus

At the end of this module students will be able to: 1. Carry out exploratory data analysis to gain insights and prepare data for predictive modeling 2. Summarize and visualize datasets using appropriate tools 3. Identify modeling techniques for prediction of continuous and discrete outcomes. 4. Explore datasets using Excel 5. Explain and perform several common data preprocessing steps 6. Choose appropriate graphs to explore and display datasets

Deep Learning Specialization on Coursera

Course Introduction

Predictive Modeling and Analytics Capstone In this course, you will design and analyze a predictive model. You will implement the model in a data scientist's hands and get feedback from your model. You will also explore the impact of your code in a real-world setting. We’ve designed this capstone project to allow you to explore the entire predictive modeling and analytics pipeline from start to finish. We’ve designed it to allow you to explore the entire model-building pipeline from beginning to end, starting with the very beginning where we’ve designed and enabled you to use pre-made models and will be bringing models to you through tutorials. We’ve designed it to allow you to explore all aspects of the data science pipeline, from data scientist to end-to-end data science pipelines. In order to receive your certificate as a predictive modeling and analytics professional you will need to pass the following quizzes and complete the capstone project. 1. Describe your work in this course and the project in question. 2. Describe the workflow of creating a predictive model. 3. Create a pre-made model from scratch. 4. Explore your code and analysis environment. 5. Get feedback on your code and analysis environment. 6. Get ready to tackle the next phase in the project pipeline.Pre-Made Models and Analytics Data Science Pipeline Predicting Value from Data Exploring Data

Course Tag

Regression Analysis Data Cleansing Predictive Modelling Exploratory Data Analysis

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Predictive analytics Predictive analytics encompasses a variety of statistical techniques from predictive modeling, machine learning, and data mining that analyze current and historical facts to make predictions about future or otherwise unknown events.
Predictive analytics Generally, the term predictive analytics is used to mean predictive modeling, "scoring" data with predictive models, and forecasting. However, people are increasingly using the term to refer to related analytical disciplines, such as descriptive modeling and decision modeling or optimization. These disciplines also involve rigorous data analysis, and are widely used in business for segmentation and decision making, but have different purposes and the statistical techniques underlying them vary.
Predictive analytics Although predictive analytics can be put to use in many applications, we outline a few examples where predictive analytics has shown positive impact in recent years.
Analytics Organizations may apply analytics to business data to describe, predict, and improve business performance. Specifically, areas within analytics include predictive analytics, prescriptive analytics, enterprise decision management, retail analytics, store assortment and stock-keeping unit optimization, marketing optimization and marketing mix modeling, web analytics, sales force sizing and optimization, price and promotion modeling, predictive science, credit risk analysis, and fraud analytics. Since analytics can require extensive computation (see big data), the algorithms and software used for analytics harness the most current methods in computer science, statistics, and mathematics.
Predictive analytics Predictive analytics is often defined as predicting at a more detailed level of granularity, i.e., generating predictive scores (probabilities) for each individual organizational element. This distinguishes it from forecasting. For example, "Predictive analytics—Technology that learns from experience (data) to predict the future behavior of individuals in order to drive better decisions." In future industrial systems, the value of predictive analytics will be to predict and prevent potential issues to achieve near-zero break-down and further be integrated into prescriptive analytics for decision optimization. Furthermore, the converted data can be used for closed-loop product life cycle improvement which is the vision of the Industrial Internet Consortium.
Predictive analytics The most popular commercial predictive analytics software packages according to the Rexer Analytics Survey for 2013 are IBM SPSS Modeler, SAS Enterprise Miner, and Dell Statistica.
Predictive analytics The approaches and techniques used to conduct predictive analytics can broadly be grouped into regression techniques and machine learning techniques.
Predictive analytics Over the last 5 years, some child welfare agencies have started using predictive analytics to flag high risk cases. The approach has been called "innovative" by the Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities (CECANF), and in Hillsborough County, Florida, where the lead child welfare agency uses a predictive modeling tool, there have been no abuse-related child deaths in the target population as of this writing.
Predictive analytics Historically, using predictive analytics tools—as well as understanding the results they delivered—required advanced skills. However, modern predictive analytics tools are no longer restricted to IT specialists. As more organizations adopt predictive analytics into decision-making processes and integrate it into their operations, they are creating a shift in the market toward business users as the primary consumers of the information. Business users want tools they can use on their own. Vendors are responding by creating new software that removes the mathematical complexity, provides user-friendly graphic interfaces and/or builds in short cuts that can, for example, recognize the kind of data available and suggest an appropriate predictive model. Predictive analytics tools have become sophisticated enough to adequately present and dissect data problems, so that any data-savvy information worker can utilize them to analyze data and retrieve meaningful, useful results. For example, modern tools present findings using simple charts, graphs, and scores that indicate the likelihood of possible outcomes.
Predictive analytics A very popular method for predictive analytics is Leo Breiman's random forests.
Predictive analytics The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) of the United States also uses predictive analytics to mine tax returns and identify tax fraud.
Predictive analytics Predictive analytics is used in actuarial science, marketing, financial services, insurance, telecommunications, retail, travel, healthcare, child protection, pharmaceuticals, capacity planning and other fields.
Predictive analytics When marketing consumer products and services, there is the challenge of keeping up with competing products and consumer behavior. Apart from identifying prospects, predictive analytics can also help to identify the most effective combination of product versions, marketing material, communication channels and timing that should be used to target a given consumer. The goal of predictive analytics is typically to lower the cost per order or cost per action.
Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories • Data Analytics: Predictive analytics, decision analytics, modeling, simulation, and optimization.
Predictive analytics Conceptually, geospatial predictive modeling is rooted in the principle that the occurrences of events being modeled are limited in distribution. Occurrences of events are neither uniform nor random in distribution—there are spatial environment factors (infrastructure, sociocultural, topographic, etc.) that constrain and influence where the locations of events occur. Geospatial predictive modeling attempts to describe those constraints and influences by spatially correlating occurrences of historical geospatial locations with environmental factors that represent those constraints and influences. Geospatial predictive modeling is a process for analyzing events through a geographic filter in order to make statements of likelihood for event occurrence or emergence.
Predictive analytics Regression models are the mainstay of predictive analytics. The focus lies on establishing a mathematical equation as a model to represent the interactions between the different variables in consideration. Depending on the situation, there are a wide variety of models that can be applied while performing predictive analytics. Some of them are briefly discussed below.
Predictive analytics Many businesses have to account for risk exposure due to their different services and determine the cost needed to cover the risk. For example, auto insurance providers need to accurately determine the amount of premium to charge to cover each automobile and driver. A financial company needs to assess a borrower's potential and ability to pay before granting a loan. For a health insurance provider, predictive analytics can analyze a few years of past medical claims data, as well as lab, pharmacy and other records where available, to predict how expensive an enrollee is likely to be in the future. Predictive analytics can help underwrite these quantities by predicting the chances of illness, default, bankruptcy, etc. Predictive analytics can streamline the process of customer acquisition by predicting the future risk behavior of a customer using application level data. Predictive analytics in the form of credit scores have reduced the amount of time it takes for loan approvals, especially in the mortgage market where lending decisions are now made in a matter of hours rather than days or even weeks. Proper predictive analytics can lead to proper pricing decisions, which can help mitigate future risk of default.
Predictive analytics A brief discussion of some of these methods used commonly for predictive analytics is provided below. A detailed study of machine learning can be found in Mitchell (1997).
Geospatial predictive modeling Geospatial predictive modeling attempts to describe those constraints and influences by
Geospatial predictive modeling that represent those constraints and influences. Geospatial predictive modeling is a process