Ruby on Rails Web Services and Integration with MongoDB

Start Date: 03/01/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/ruby-on-rails-web-services-mongodb

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About Course

In this course, we will explore MongoDB, a very popular NoSQL database and Web Services concepts and integrate them both with Ruby on Rails. MongoDB is a used to handle documents with a pre-defined schema which will give the developers an ability to store, process and use data using it’s rich API. The modules will go in-depth from installation to CRUD operations, aggregation, indexing, GridFS and various other topics where we continuously integrate MongoDB with RailsRuby. We will be covering the interface to MongoDB using the Mongo Ruby API and the Mongoid ORM framework (the MongoDB access counterpart to RDBMS/ActiveRecord within Rails). The last portion of the course will focus on Web Services with emphasis on REST, its architectural style and integration of Web Services with Rails. Core concepts of Web Services like request/response, filters, data representation (XML/JSON), web linking and best practices will covered in depth. This course is ideal for students and professionals who have some programming experience and a working knowledge of databases.

Course Syllabus

In this module, we’re going to explore the history and the rationale behind NoSQL databases, their relationship to RDBMS, and dive into the basics of MongoDB. We will install MongoDB, create a database, collections and perform CRUD operations. We will end this module by integrating MongoDB with Ruby Shell and try out some simple examples.

Deep Learning Specialization on Coursera

Course Introduction

Ruby on Rails Web Services and Integration with MongoDB In this course, we will: Learn about the web services included in the Ruby on Rails application development life cycle Set up web services through the command line Install and use services like Nginx Create a web application using the command line Integrate the web application development life cycle through HTTP and REST Use the command line interface to work with the data and manage the application Explore the web services included in the application development life cycle Set up web services through the command line Install and use services like Nginx Create a web application using the command line Explore the web services included in the application development life cycle Use the command line interface to work with the data and manage the application Write a web application using the command line Write a web application using the command line for integration with the rest of the application development life cycle Integrate the web application development life cycle through HTTP and REST Install and use services like Nginx Create a web application using the command line Explore the web services included in the application development life cycle Use the command line interface to work with the data and manage the application Write a web application using the command line Write a web application using the command line for integration with the rest of the application development life cycle Explore the web services included in the application development life cycle Use the command line interface to

Course Tag

Web Service Mongodb Ruby On Rails

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Ruby on Rails Ruby on Rails is also noteworthy for its extensive use of the JavaScript libraries, Prototype and Script.aculo.us, for scripting Ajax actions. Ruby on Rails initially utilized lightweight SOAP for web services; this was later replaced by RESTful web services. Ruby on Rails 3.0 uses a technique called Unobtrusive JavaScript to separate the functionality (or logic) from the structure of the web page. jQuery is fully supported as a replacement for Prototype and is the default JavaScript library in Rails 3.1, reflecting an industry-wide move towards jQuery. Additionally, CoffeeScript was introduced in Rails 3.1 as the default Javascript language.
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