Accelerated Computer Science Fundamentals Specialization

Start Date: 03/29/2020

Course Type: Specialization Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/cs-fundamentals

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About Course

Topics covered by this Specialization include basic object-oriented programming, the analysis of asymptotic algorithmic run times, and the implementation of basic data structures including arrays, hash tables, linked lists, trees, heaps and graphs, as well as algorithms for traversals, rebalancing and shortest paths. This Specialization sequence is designed to help prospective applicants to the flexible and affordable Online Master of Computer Science (MCS) and MCS in Data Science prepare for the Online MCS Entrance Exam. The Online MCS Entrance Exam allows applicants who do not have graded and transcripted prerequisite CS coursework in the areas of data structures, algorithms, and object-oriented programming to strengthen their applications for admission. Learn more about the Online MCS Entrance Exam.

Course Syllabus

Object-Oriented Data Structures in C++
Ordered Data Structures
Unordered Data Structures

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Course Introduction

Data Structures and Algorithms in C++. Learn fundamentals of computer science while implementing efficient data structures in C++. Accelerated Computer Science Fundamentals Specialization This accelerated course introduces the Specialization concepts and provides a powerful introduction to accelerated computer science. The Specialization is designed for anyone with some programming background and computer science knowledge, but it is particularly useful for those who want to jumpstart their career in computer science. This Specialization is designed to help you complete a series of tasks in order to complete a small assignment and complete a larger assignment in parallel. You will need to use the knowledge you gain in this Specialization to complete the larger assignments in parallel. This Specialization is designed to help you complete a series of tasks in order to complete a small assignment and complete a larger assignment in parallel. You will need to use the knowledge you gain in this Specialization to complete the larger assignments in parallel. This Specialization is designed to help you complete a series of tasks in order to complete a small assignment and complete a larger assignment in parallel. You will need to use the knowledge you gain in this Specialization to complete the larger assignments in parallel. This Specialization is designed to help you complete a series of tasks in order to complete a small assignment and complete a larger assignment in parallel. You will need to use the knowledge you gain in this Specialization to complete the larger assignments in parallel. This Specialization is designed to help you complete a series of tasks in order to complete a small assignment and complete a larger assignment in parallel. You will need to use the knowledge you gain in this Specialization

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