Developing Industrial Internet of Things Specialization

Start Date: 07/04/2021

Course Type: Specialization Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/developing-industrial-iot

About Course

The courses in this specialization can also be taken for academic credit as ECEA 5385-5387, part of CU Boulder’s Master of Science in Electrical Engineering degree. Enroll here. In this specialization, you will engage the vast array of technologies that can be used to build an industrial internet of things deployment. You'll encounter market sizes and opportunities, operating systems, networking concepts, many security topics, how to plan, staff and execute a project plan, sensors, file systems and how storage devices work, machine learning and big data analytics, an introduction to SystemC, techniques for debugging deeply embedded systems, promoting technical ideas within a company and learning from failures. In addition, students will learn several key business concepts important for engineers to understand, like CapEx (capital expenditure) for buying a piece of lab equipment and OpEx (operational expense) for rent, utilities and employee salaries.

Course Syllabus

Industrial IoT Markets and Security
Project Planning and Machine Learning
Modeling and Debugging Embedded Systems

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Course Introduction

Engage the Technology that Drives Industrial IoT. Master the key skills required to be employed in the Industrial Internet of Things space Developing Industrial Internet of Things Specialization This 5-week long course builds on the successful course EARTH2LIFE and EARTHFOUNDERS. You will design and build an embedded system in a PDP-8 environment. In this course, we will learn about the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and related topics. We will also focus on the design and production of Integrated Circuits (IoC) in embedded systems. The focus of the course is on the operation and configuration of the system to optimize system performance and reduce the amount of firmware to firmware spread around the system. At the end of this course, you will be able to: 1. Design an integrated circuit for embedded system development and design 2. Develop a logic analyzer or program for data crosstalk analysis 3. Develop a logic analyzer or program for software-level data crosstalk analysis 4. Design an integrated circuit for embedded system production and production 5. Design a logic analyzer or program for data crosstalk analysis 6. Design an integrated circuit for embedded system operation and configuration 7. Develop a logic analyzer or program for data crosstalk analysis 8. Design an integrated circuit for embedded system production and production The course is self-contained, and is intended for independent study or as part of a team's development of a system. The course requires the completion of an engineering analysis, and a formal foundation on circuits,

Course Tag

best security practices machine learning and big data analytics leading platforms for IIoT development operating systems in IIoT deployments wireless protocols

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Internet of things The term IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things) is often encountered in the manufacturing industries, referring to the industrial subset of the IoT. IIoT in manufacturing would probably generate so much business value that it will eventually lead to the fourth industrial revolution, so the so-called Industry 4.0. It is estimated that in the future, successful companies will be able to increase their revenue through Internet of things by creating new business models and improve productivity, exploit analytics for innovation, and transform workforce. The potential of growth by implementing IIoT will generate $12 trillion of global GDP by 2030.
Internet of things Ambient intelligence and autonomous control are not part of the original concept of the Internet of things. Ambient intelligence and autonomous control do not necessarily require Internet structures, either. However, there is a shift in research to integrate the concepts of the Internet of things and autonomous control, with initial outcomes towards this direction considering objects as the driving force for autonomous IoT.
Internet of things Building on top of the Internet of things, the web of things is an architecture for the application layer of the Internet of things looking at the convergence of data from IoT devices into Web applications to create innovative use-cases. In order to program and control the flow of information in the Internet of things, a predicted architectural direction is being called BPM Everywhere which is a blending of traditional process management with process mining and special capabilities to automate the control of large numbers of coordinated devices.
Internet of things The concept of the Internet of things became popular in 1999, through the Auto-ID Center at MIT and related market-analysis publications. Radio-frequency identification (RFID) was seen by Kevin Ashton (one of the founders of the original Auto-ID Center) as a prerequisite for the Internet of things at that point. Ashton prefers the phrase "Internet "for" Things." If all objects and people in daily life were equipped with identifiers, computers could manage and inventory them. Besides using RFID, the "tagging" of things may be achieved through such technologies as near field communication, barcodes, QR codes and digital watermarking.
Internet of things , the vision of the Internet of things has evolved due to a convergence of multiple technologies, including ubiquitous wireless communication, real-time analytics, machine learning, commodity sensors, and embedded systems. This means that the traditional fields of embedded systems, wireless sensor networks, control systems, automation (including home and building automation), and others all contribute to enabling the Internet of things (IoT).
Internet of things Other applications that the Internet of things can provide is enabling extended home security features and home automation. The concept of an "Internet of living things" has been proposed to describe networks of biological sensors that could use cloud-based analyses to allow users to study DNA or other molecules.
Internet of things IoT frameworks might help support the interaction between "things" and allow for more complex structures like distributed computing and the development of distributed applications. Currently, some IoT frameworks seem to focus on real-time data logging solutions like Jasper Technologies, Inc. and Xively (formerly Cosm and before that Pachube), offering some basis to work with many "things" and have them interact. Future developments might lead to specific software-development environments to create the software to work with the hardware used in the Internet of things. Companies are developing technology platforms to provide this type of functionality for the Internet of things. Newer platforms are being developed, which add more intelligence. Foremost, IBM has announced cognitive IoT, which combines traditional IoT with machine intelligence and learning, contextual information, industry-specific models, and even natural language processing.
Internet of things As a response to increasing concerns over security, the Internet of Things Security Foundation (IoTSF) was launched on 23 September 2015. IoTSF has a mission to secure the Internet of things by promoting knowledge and best practice. Its founding board is made from technology providers and telecommunications companies including BT, Vodafone, Imagination Technologies and Pen Test Partners.
Internet of things According to Gartner, Inc. (a technology research and advisory corporation), there will be nearly 20.8 billion devices on the Internet of things by 2020. ABI Research estimates that more than 30 billion devices will be wirelessly connected to the Internet of things by 2020. As per a 2014 survey and study done by Pew Research Internet Project, a large majority of the technology experts and engaged Internet users who responded—83 percent—agreed with the notion that the Internet/Cloud of Things, embedded and wearable computing (and the corresponding dynamic systems) will have widespread and beneficial effects by 2025. As such, it is clear that the IoT will consist of a very large number of devices being connected to the Internet. In an active move to accommodate new and emerging technological innovation, the UK Government, in their 2015 budget, allocated £40,000,000 towards research into the Internet of things. The former British Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, posited that the Internet of things is the next stage of the information revolution and referenced the inter-connectivity of everything from urban transport to medical devices to household appliances.
Internet of things In 2016, a distributed denial of service attack powered by Internet of things devices running the Mirai malware took down a DNS provider and major web sites.
Internet of things The term "the Internet of Things" was coined by Kevin Ashton of Procter & Gamble, later MIT's Auto-ID Center, in 1999.
Internet of things Kevin Lonergan at Information Age, a business-technology magazine, has referred to the terms surrounding IoT as a “terminology zoo”. The lack of clear terminology is not “useful from a practical point of view” and a “source of confusion for the end user”. A company operating in the IoT space could be working in anything related to sensor technology, networking, embedded systems, or analytics. According to Lonergan, the term IoT was coined before smart phones, tablets, and devices as we know them today existed, and there is a long list of terms with varying degrees of overlap and technological convergence: Internet of Things (IoT), Internet of Everything (IoE), Industrial Internet, Pervasive Computing, Pervasive Sensing, Ubiquitous Computing, Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN), Smart Objects, Cooperating Objects, Machine-to-Machine (M2M), Ambient Intelligence (AmI), Operational Technology (OT), and Information Technology (IT). Regarding IIoT, an industrial sub-field of IoT, the Industrial Internet Consortium's Vocabulary Task Group has created a "common and reusable vocabulary of terms" to ensure "consistent terminology" across publications issued by the Industrial Internet Consortium. IoT One has created an IoT Terms Database including a New Term Alert to be notified when a new term is published. As of March 2017, this database aggregates 711 IoT-related terms, however, without any attempts to reduce terminological ambiguity and complexity.
Internet of things In the Internet of things, the precise geographic location of a thing—and also the precise geographic dimensions of a thing—will be critical. Therefore, facts about a thing, such as its location in time and space, have been less critical to track because the person processing the information can decide whether or not that information was important to the action being taken, and if so, add the missing information (or decide to not take the action). (Note that some things in the Internet of things will be sensors, and sensor location is usually important.) The GeoWeb and Digital Earth are promising applications that become possible when things can become organized and connected by location. However, the challenges that remain include the constraints of variable spatial scales, the need to handle massive amounts of data, and an indexing for fast search and neighbor operations. In the Internet of things, if things are able to take actions on their own initiative, this human-centric mediation role is eliminated. Thus, the time-space context that we as humans take for granted must be given a central role in this information ecosystem. Just as standards play a key role in the Internet and the Web, geospatial standards will play a key role in the Internet of things.
Internet of things Internet of things devices additionally will benefit from the stateless address auto-configuration present in IPv6, as it reduces the configuration overhead on the hosts, and the IETF 6LoWPAN header compression. To a large extent, the future of the Internet of things will not be possible without the support of IPv6; and consequently the global adoption of IPv6 in the coming years will be critical for the successful development of the IoT in the future.
Industrial Internet Consortium Industrial Internet Consortium member, EMC Corporation, is leading the INFINITE testbed. Also contributing their expertise to this project is Industrial Internet Consortium member Cork Institute of Technology, as well as Vodafone, the Irish Government Networks, Asavie and Cork Internet Exchange.
Internet of things The Internet of Things Council compared the increased prevalence of digital surveillance due to the Internet of things to the conceptual panopticon described by Jeremy Bentham in the 18th Century. The assertion was defended by the works of French philosophers Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze. In "Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison" Foucault asserts that the panopticon was a central element of the discipline society developed during the Industrial Era. Foucault also argued that the discipline systems established in factories and school reflected Bentham's vision of panopticism. In his 1992 paper "Postscripts on the Societies of Control," Deleuze wrote that the discipline society had transitioned into a control society, with the computer replacing the panopticon as an instrument of discipline and control while still maintaining the qualities similar to that of panopticism.
Internet of things In its original interpretation, one of the first consequences of implementing the Internet of things by equipping all objects in the world with minuscule identifying devices or machine-readable identifiers would be to transform daily life.
Internet of things The Internet of things requires huge scalability in the network space to handle the surge of devices. IETF 6LoWPAN would be used to connect devices to IP networks. With billions of devices being added to the Internet space, IPv6 will play a major role in handling the network layer scalability. IETF's Constrained Application Protocol, MQTT and ZeroMQ would provide lightweight data transport.
Internet of things The Internet of things would encode 50 to 100 trillion objects, and be able to follow the movement of those objects. Human beings in surveyed urban environments are each surrounded by 1000 to 5000 trackable objects.
Internet of things Given widespread recognition of the evolving nature of the design and management of the Internet of things, sustainable and secure deployment of IoT solutions must design for "anarchic scalability." Application of the concept of anarchic scalability can be extended to physical systems (i.e. controlled real-world objects), by virtue of those systems being designed to account for uncertain management futures. This "hard anarchic scalability" thus provides a pathway forward to fully realize the potential of Internet of things solutions by selectively constraining physical systems to allow for all management regimes without risking physical failure.