IBM Microservices Specialization

Start Date: 01/12/2020

Course Type: Specialization Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/ibm-microservices

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About Course

IMPORTANT UPDATE: We are reaching out to let you know that the IBM Microservices Specialization will be removed from Coursera on January 13, 2020. If you are interested in earning a Specialization Certificate, you will need to complete all 4 courses of the Specialization by January 12, 2020. Separately, if you are interested in earning Course Certificate for this course, please upgrade or apply for Financial Aid by January 12, 2020, if you have not already done so. If you are a Coursera for Business learner, you can continue to use your sponsored credit. In order to earn a Course Certificate, you will need to complete all graded assignments by April 12, 2020. After that point, no new assignment submissions will be accepted for Certificate credit. While we hope that you will be able to complete the course, you can find more information about requesting a refund (https://learner.coursera.help/hc/en-us/articles/209819043-Request-a-refund) or unenrolling from a course (https://learner.coursera.help/hc/en-us/articles/208279756-Unenroll-from-a-course) in our Learner Help Center. Happy Learning, The IBM team

Course Syllabus

Microservices - Fundamentals
Developing and Deploying Microservices with Microclimate
IBM Cloud: Deploying Microservices with Kubernetes
IBM Cloud Private: Deploying Microservices with Kubernetes

Deep Learning Specialization on Coursera

Course Introduction

IBM Microservices Specialization-

Course Tag

Microservices Kubernetes Devops Cloud Computing

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Microservices Too-fine-grained microservices have been criticized as an anti-pattern, dubbed a nanoservice by Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz:
Microservices The microservices approach is subject to criticism for a number of issues:
Microservices Microservices is a specialisation of an implementation approach for service-oriented architectures (SOA) used to build flexible, independently deployable software systems. The microservices approach is a first realisation of SOA that followed the introduction of DevOps and is becoming more popular for building continuously deployed systems.
Microservices The philosophy of the microservices architecture essentially equals to the Unix philosophy of "Do one thing and do it well". It is described as follows:
Microservices There is no industry consensus yet regarding the properties of microservices, and an official definition is missing as well. Some of the defining characteristics that are frequently cited include:
Microservices Microservices - also known as the microservice architecture - is an architectural style that structures an application as a collection of loosely coupled services. In a microservices architecture, services should be fine-grained and the protocols should be lightweight. The benefit of decomposing an application into different smaller services is that it improves modularity and makes the application easier to understand, develop and test. It also parallelizes development by enabling small autonomous teams to develop, deploy and scale their respective services independently. It also allows the architecture of an individual service to emerge through continuous refactoring. The microservice architecture enables continuous delivery and deployment.
Microservices A workshop of software architects held near Venice in May 2011 used the term "microservice" to describe what the participants saw as a common architectural style that many of them had been recently exploring. In May 2012, the same group decided on "microservices" as the most appropriate name. James Lewis presented some of those ideas as a case study in March 2012 at 33rd Degree in Kraków in Microservices - Java, the Unix Way, as did Fred George about the same time. Adrian Cockcroft at Netflix, describing this approach as "fine grained SOA", pioneered the style at web scale, as did many of the others mentioned in this article - Joe Walnes, Dan North, Evan Bottcher and Graham Tackley.
Interactive specialization According to the second, the Interactive Specialization (IS)
Specialization (functional) Specialization is when people specialize in one thing or another which they are good at.
Specialization (functional) Adam Smith described economic specialization in his classic work, "The Wealth of Nations".
Academic specialization As the volume of knowledge accumulated by humanity became too great, increasing specialization in academia appeared in response.
Partial template specialization Partial template specialization is a particular form of class template specialization. Usually used in reference to the C++ programming language, it allows the programmer to specialize only some arguments of a class template, as opposed to explicit specialization, where all the template arguments are provided.
Specialization (pre)order For any sober space "X" with specialization order ≤, we have
Academic specialization In academia, specialization (or specialisation) may be a course of study or major at an academic institution or may refer to the field that a specialist practices in.
Specialization (pre)order The specialization order is often considered in applications in computer science, where T spaces occur in denotational semantics. The specialization order is also important for identifying suitable topologies on partially ordered sets, as it is done in order theory.
Specialization (pre)order The specialization order yields a tool to obtain a partial order from every topology. It is natural to ask for the converse too: Is every partial order obtained as a specialization order of some topology?
Specialization (functional) Specialization (or specialisation) is the separation of tasks within a system. In a multicellular creature, cells are specialized for functions such as bone construction or oxygen transport. In capitalist societies, individual workers specialize for functions such as building construction or gasoline transport. In both cases, specialization enables the accomplishment of otherwise unattainable goals. It also reduces the ability of individuals to survive outside of the system containing all of the specialized components.
Functional specialization (brain) Subsequent cases (such as Broca's patient Tan) gave further support to the doctrine of specialization.
Functional specialization (brain) Functional specialization suggests that different areas in the brain are specialized for different functions.
Specialization (pre)order On the other hand, the symmetry of specialization preorder is equivalent to the R separation axiom: "x" ≤ "y" if and only if "x" and "y" are topologically indistinguishable. It follows that if the underlying topology is T, then the specialization order is discrete, i.e. one has "x" ≤ "y" if and only if "x" = "y". Hence, the specialization order is of little interest for T topologies, especially for all Hausdorff spaces.