Grow to Greatness: Smart Growth for Private Businesses, Part I

Start Date: 07/05/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/uva-darden-smart-growth-strategy-1

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About Course

This course focuses on challenges faced by existing private businesses when they attempt to grow substantially.

Course Syllabus

This module presents an overview of growth in business with common myths and truths. There is a required reading: Edward D. Hess, "Growth is the Dynamic Confluence of Strategy, Entrepreneurship, and Values." An option case study reading on Eyebobs Eyeware, Inc is also available. Please visit the Eyebobs website at https://www.eyebobs.com and think about whether Julie's vision and customer value proposition connects with you. What do you like about the site? What do you dislike? Why is her website so important to her business? What should Julie do to keep her website "fresh"?

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Course Introduction

Grow to Greatness: Smart Growth for Private Businesses, Part I This course introduces you to the topic of smart growth. You will learn how to apply a set of principles and tools to your business. You will be introduced to a set of tools and a framework to measure success. You will also learn how to measure failure and to analyze performance. You will then learn about different measurement techniques, including performance measurement, and their best practices. You will also learn about different methods for assessing success, including customer value-based and performance metrics, loyalty programs, and customer focus. You will then learn about different methods for assessing failure, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices. You will also learn about different methods for assessing performance, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices. You will also learn about different methods for assessing success, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices. You will then learn about different methods for assessing success, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices. You will then learn about different methods for assessing success, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices. You will then learn about different methods for assessing success, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices. You will then learn about different methods for assessing success, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices. You will then learn about different methods for assessing success, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices. You will then learn about different methods for assessing success, including different measurement techniques, and their best practices.

Course Tag

Planning Entrepreneurship Business Intelligence Innovation Strategic Management

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Smart growth The smart growth Network has recognized these U.S. cities for implementing smart growth principles:
Smart growth Related, but somewhat different, are the overarching goals of smart growth, and they include: making the community more competitive for new businesses, providing alternative places to shop, work, and play, creating a better "Sense of Place," providing jobs for residents, increasing property values, improving quality of life, expanding the tax base, preserving open space, controlling growth, and improving safety.
Smart growth Smart growth "principles" describe the elements of community that are envisioned and smart growth "regulations" describe the various approaches to implementation, that is, how federal, state, and municipal governments choose to fulfill smart growth principles. Some of these regulatory approaches such as Urban Growth Boundaries predate the use of the term Smart Growth. One of the earliest efforts to establish smart growth forward as an explicit regulatory framework were put forth by the American Planning Association. In 1997, the APA introduced a project called Growing Smart and published "Growing Smart Legislative Guidebook: Model Statutes for Planning and the Management of Change." The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency defines smart growth as “development that serves the economy, the community, and the environment. It changes the terms of the development debate away from the traditional growth/no growth question to how and where should new development be accommodated”
Smart growth Smart Growth America, an organization devoted to the promoting Smart Growth in the United States, was founded in 2002. This organization leads an evolving coalition of national and regional organizations most of which predated its founding such as 1000 Friends of Oregon founded in 1975 and the Congress for the New Urbanism founded in 1993. The EPA launched its smart growth program in 1995.
Smart growth The Local Government Commission which presents the annual New Partners for Smart Growth conference adopted the original Ahwahnee Principles in 1991 which articulates many of the major principles now generally accepted as part of smart growth movement such as Transit oriented development, a focus on walking distance, greenbelts and wildlife corridors, and infill and redevelopment. The document was co-authored by several of the founders of the New Urbanist movement. The Local Government Commission has been co-sponsoring Smart Growth related conferences since 1997. The New Partners for Smart Growth Conference started under that name circa 2002.
Smart growth Growth is "smart growth", to the extent that it includes the elements listed below.
Smart growth The phrase "smart growth" implies that other growth and development theories are not "smart". There is debate about whether transit-proximate development constitutes smart growth when it is not transit-oriented. The National Motorists Association does not object to smart growth as a whole, but strongly objects to traffic calming, which is intended to reduce automobile accidents and fatalities, but may also reduce automobile usage and increase alternate forms of public transportation.
Smart growth In 2002 the National Center for Public Policy Research, a self-described conservative think tank, published an economic study entitled "Smart Growth and Its Effects on Housing Markets: The New Segregation" which termed smart growth "restricted growth" and suggested that smart growth policies disfavor minorities and the poor by driving up housing prices.
Smart growth Wendell Cox is a vocal opponent of smart growth policies. He argued before the United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works that, "smart growth strategies tend to intensify the very problems they are purported to solve." Cox and Joshua Utt analyzed smart growth and sprawl, and argued that:
Room & Board Room & Board was named one of the "100 Best Companies to Work For" by "Minnesota Business" in 2013. The University of Virginia Darden Graduate School of Business professor Edward D. Hess profiled Room & Board's growth strategy in his book "Grow to Greatness: Smart Growth for Entrepreneurial Businesses"." In 2011, "Internet Retailer" mentioned Room & Board's online furniture shopping system in their "The Hot 100" article.
Smart growth The United States Environmental Protection Agency has recognized these cities for implementing smart growth principles:
Organic growth Organic growth is growth that comes from a company's existing businesses, as opposed to growth that comes from buying new businesses. It may be negative. Through Growth planning, businesses are able to achieve organic growth by selecting the best strategies available to them. For example, by examining Ansoff's matrix, businesses can select from market penetration, market development, product development and diversification to grow their revenue organically.
Smart growth Smart growth is related to, or may be used in combination with the following concepts:
Smart growth Smart Growth is a theory of land development that accepts that growth and development will continue to occur, and so seeks to direct that growth in an intentional, comprehensive way. Its proponents include urban planners, architects, developers, community activists, and historic preservationists. The term "Smart Growth" is an attempt to reframe the conversation from "growth" versus "no growth" (or NIMBY) to good/smart growth versus bad/dumb growth. Proponents seek to distinguish Smart Growth from urban sprawl which they claim causes most of the problems that fuel opposition to urban growth, such as traffic congestion and environmental degradation. Smart growth principles are directed at developing sustainable communities that provide a greater range of transportation and housing choices and prioritize infill and redevelopment in existing communities rather than development of "greenfield" farmland or natural lands. Some of the fundamental aims for the benefits of residents and the communities are increasing family income and wealth, providing safe walking routes to schools, fostering livable, safe and healthy places, stimulating economic activity (both locally and regionally), and developing, preserving and investing in built and natural resources.
Smart growth A study released in November 2009 characterized the smart-growth policies in the U.S. state of Maryland as a failure, concluding that "[t]here is no evidence after ten years that [smart-growth laws] have had any effect on development patterns." Factors include a lack of incentives for builders to redevelop older neighborhoods and limits on the ability of state planners to force local jurisdictions to approve high-density developments in "smart-growth" areas. Buyers demand low-density development and because voters tend to oppose high density developments near them.
Smart growth The smart growth approach to development is multifaceted and can encompass a variety of techniques. For example, in the state of Massachusetts smart growth is enacted by a combination of techniques including increasing housing density along transit nodes, conserving farm land, and mixing residential and commercial use areas. Perhaps the most descriptive term to characterize this concept is Traditional Neighborhood Development, which recognizes that smart growth and related concepts are not necessarily new, but are a response to car culture and sprawl. Many favor the term New Urbanism, which invokes a new, but traditional way of looking at urban planning.
Smart growth Smart Growth advocates claim that much of the urban sprawl of the 19th Century was due to government subsidies for infrastructure that redistribute the true costs of sprawl. Examples include subsidies for highway building, fossil fuels, and electricity.
Smart growth There are 10 accepted principles that define smart growth:
Smart growth Reviewing the evidence on urban intensification, smart growth and their effects on travel behaviour Melia "et al." (2011) found support for the arguments of both supporters and opponents of smart growth. Planning policies which increase population densities in urban areas do tend to reduce car use, but the effect is a weak one, so doubling the population density of a particular area will not halve the frequency or distance of car use.
Smart growth In Savannah, Georgia (US) the historic Oglethorpe Plan has been shown to contain most of the elements of smart growth in its network of wards, each of which has a central civic square. The plan has demonstrated its resilience to changing conditions, and the city is using the plan as a model for growth in newer areas.