Viral Marketing and How to Craft Contagious Content

Start Date: 07/05/2020

Course Type: Common Course

Course Link: https://www.coursera.org/learn/wharton-contagious-viral-marketing

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About Course

Ever wondered why some things become popular, and other don't? Why some products become hits while others flop? Why some ideas take off while others languish? What are the key ideas behind viral marketing? This course explains how things catch on and helps you apply these ideas to be more effective at marketing your ideas, brands, or products. You'll learn how to make ideas stick, how to increase your influence, how to generate more word of mouth, and how to use the power of social networks to spread information and influence. Drawing on principles from his best-selling book, "Contagious: Why Things Catch On," Professor Jonah Berger illustrates successful strategies for you to use buzz to create virality so that your campaigns become more shareable on social media and elsewhere. By the end of this course, you'll have a better understanding of how to craft contagious content, build stickier messages, and get any product, idea, or behavior to catch on.

Course Syllabus

In this module, you'll start to learn what makes products, ideas, and behaviors contagious; in other words, why they catch on. You'll explore the science behind why some things become popular while others fail. You'll also discover the key principles, or six SUCCESs” factors that make messages stick. Finally, you'll learn how to make any idea more memorable, whether it’s a pitch to your boss or a lesson you want students to remember.

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Course Introduction

Viral Marketing and How to Craft Contagious Content Learners in this course will work on a case study about a specific viral marketing campaign. They will analyze the campaign’s methodology, the online context, and the social context in which it works. They will also analyze the marketing campaign’s structure and the results. They will analyze the marketing as a whole and its components, including content.Introduction, Conceptual Framework, and Brand Awareness Digital Marketing Social Context and Marketing Communication Social Media Politics and Impact Marketing Vocabulary and Phonology: Building Blocks of Speech This course will teach you vocabulary, phonology, and vocabulary. You will learn about the different vowel sounds and how they are related. You will also learn about consonant sounds and how they are related. You will learn about the different sounds you can make in your head and how to recognize them. You will also learn about how to recognize the different vowel sounds in your native tongue. Finally, you will learn how to recognize the difference between the consonant and vowel sounds. You will also learn about how to perform basic phonology tasks, such as recognizing the basic sounds of words and phrases, understanding spoken pronunciation, and learning to read people’s voices. You will also learn about how to use vocabulary to help you speak clearly. Vocabulary is important. Learn to read people's voices, read them back, then move on. This is important.

Course Tag

Social Network Viral Marketing Marketing Marketing Strategy

Related Wiki Topic

Article Example
Viral marketing Whereas Kaplan, Haenlein and others reduce the role of marketers to crafting the initial viral message and seeding it, futurist and sales and marketing analyst Marc Feldman, who conducted IMT Strategies' viral marketing study in 2001, carves a different role for marketers which pushes the 'art' of viral marketing much closer to 'science'.
Content marketing Content marketing is a form of marketing focused on creating, publishing and distributing content for a targeted audience online. It is often used by businesses in order to:
Viral phenomenon The use of viral marketing is shifting from the concept that the content drives its own attention to the intended attempt to draw the attention. The companies are worried about making their content 'go viral' and how their customers' communication has the potential to circulate it widely. There has been a lot of discussion about morality in doing viral marketing. Iain Short (2010) points out that many applications on twitter and Facebook generates automated marketing message and update it on audience personal timeline without users personally pass it along.
Viral marketing Consumers' behavior is expected to lead to contributions to the bottom line of the company, meaning increase in sales, both in quantity and financial amount. However, when quantifying changes in sales, managers need to consider other factors that could potentially affect sales besides the viral marketing activities. Besides positive effects on sales, the use of viral marketing is expected to bring significant reductions in marketing costs and expenses.
Viral marketing Viral marketing, viral advertising, or marketing buzz are buzzwords referring to marketing techniques that use pre-existing social networking services and other technologies to try to produce increases in brand awareness or to achieve other marketing objectives (such as product sales) through self-replicating viral processes, analogous to the spread of viruses or computer viruses (cf. Internet memes and memetics). It can be delivered by word of mouth or enhanced by the network effects of the Internet and mobile networks. Viral advertising is personal and, while coming from an identified sponsor, it does not mean businesses pay for its distribution. Most of the well-known viral ads circulating online are ads paid by a sponsor company, launched either on their own platform (company webpage or social media profile) or on social media websites such as YouTube. Consumers receive the page link from a social media network or copy the entire ad from a website and pass it along through e-mail or posting it on a blog, webpage or social media profile. Viral marketing may take the form of video clips, interactive Flash games, advergames, ebooks, brandable software, images, text messages, email messages, or web pages. The most commonly utilized transmission vehicles for viral messages include: pass-along based, incentive based, trendy based, and undercover based. However, the creative nature of viral marketing enables an "endless amount of potential forms and vehicles the messages can utilize for transmission", including mobile devices.
Viral marketing According to marketing professors Andreas Kaplan and Michael Haenlein, to make viral marketing work, three basic criteria must be met, i.e., giving the right message to the right messengers in the right environment:
Viral marketing The term "viral marketing" has also been used pejoratively to refer to stealth marketing campaigns—marketing strategies that advertise a product to people without them knowing they are being marketed to.
Viral marketing In early 2013 the first ever Viral Summit was held in Las Vegas. It attempted to identify similar trends in viral marketing methods for various media.
Content marketing The phrase "content marketing" was used as early as 1996, when John F. Oppedahl led a roundtable for journalists at the American Society for Newspaper Editors. In 1998, Jerrell Jimerson held the title of "director of online and content marketing" at Netscape. In 1999, author Jeff Cannon wrote,“In content marketing, content is created to provide consumers with the information they seek.”
Viral marketing Viral target marketing is based on three important principles:
Viral marketing To clarify and organize the information related to potential measures of viral campaigns, the key measurement possibilities should be considered in relation to the objectives formulated for the viral campaign. In this sense, some of the key cognitive outcomes of viral marketing activities can include measures such as the number of views, clicks, and hits for specific content, as well as the number of shares in social media, such as likes on Facebook or retweets on Twitter, which demonstrate that consumers processed the information received through the marketing message. Measures such as the number of reviews for a product or the number of members for a campaign webpage quantify the number of individuals who have acknowledged the information provided by marketers. Besides statistics that are related to online traffic, surveys can assess the degree of product or brand knowledge, though this type of measurement is more complicated and requires more resources.
Viral marketing The ultimate goal of marketers interested in creating successful viral marketing programs is to create viral messages that appeal to individuals with high social networking potential (SNP) and that have a high probability of being presented and spread by these individuals and their competitors in their communications with others in a short period of time.
Viral phenomenon The term "viral marketing" was first popularized in 1995, after Hotmail spreading their service offer "Get your free web-base email at Hotmail" Viral marketing is the phenomena when people actively assess media or content and decide to spread to others such as making a word-of-mouth recommendation, passing content through social media, posting video to YouTube. Viral marketing has become important in the business field in building brand recognition, with companies trying to get their customers and other audiences involved in circulating and sharing their content on social media both in voluntary and involuntary ways. A lot of brands undertake guerrilla marketing or buzz marketing to gain public attention. Some marketing campaigns seek to engage an audience to unwittingly pass along their campaign message.
Content marketing There are 3 distribution strategies for successful content marketing, each with tradeoffs in customization, reach, and time commitment. Content distribution is often among the most overlooked aspects of a successful content marketing campaign, as it requires a consistent time commitment.
Viral marketing Burger King has used several marketing campaigns. Its The Subservient Chicken campaign, running from 2004 until 2007, was an example of viral or word-of-mouth marketing.
Content marketing Unlike other forms of online marketing, content marketing relies on anticipating and meeting an existing customer need for information, as opposed to creating demand for a new need. As James O'Brien of Contently wrote on Mashable, "The idea central to content marketing is that a brand must give something valuable to get something valuable in return. Instead of the commercial, be the show. Instead of the banner ad, be the feature story."
Mobile phone content advertising A new approach to mobile content advertising is the use of viral marketing. Through specially designed programmes users can send recommendations for mobile content they like to their contact lists. Passa Parola, the Italian version of Meyou, has reached a total of 800,000 registered users, by the use of viral marketing alone. From: "MoConDi has the viral say".
Viral Marketing Research Viral Marketing Research is a subset of marketing research that measures and compares the relative return on investment (ROI) of advertising and communication strategies designed to exploit social networks.
Content marketing Metrics to determine the success of a content marketing are often tied to the original goals of the campaign.
Content marketing When businesses pursue content marketing, the main focus should be the needs of the prospect or customer. Once a business has identified the customer's need, information can be presented in a variety of formats, including news, video, white papers, e-books, infographics, email newsletters, case studies, podcasts, how-to guides, question and answer articles, photos, blogs, etc.